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Spatiotemporal gait parameters and plantar pressure distribution during barefoot walking in people with gout and asymptomatic hyperuricemia: comparison with healthy individuals with normal serum…

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
Title
Spatiotemporal gait parameters and plantar pressure distribution during barefoot walking in people with gout and asymptomatic hyperuricemia: comparison with healthy individuals with normal serum urate concentrations
Published in
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, April 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13047-016-0147-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah Stewart, Nicola Dalbeth, Alain C. Vandal, Keith Rome

Abstract

To identify spatiotemporal gait parameters and plantar pressure distribution during barefoot walking in people with gout and people with asymptomatic hyperuricemia by comparing them to healthy individuals with normal serum urate concentrations. Eighty-seven participants were included: 24 with gout, 29 with asymptomatic hyperuricemia and 34 age- and sex-matched normouricemic control participants. Spatiotemporal parameters of gait were assessed during level barefoot walking using a GAITRite® walkway. Peak plantar pressure and pressure time integrals were recorded using a TekScan MatScan®. Results were adjusted for age and body mass index. Compared to normouricemic control participants, participants with gout demonstrated increased step time (P = 0.022) and stance time (P = 0.022), and reduced velocity (P = 0.050). Participants with gout also walked with decreased peak pressure at the heel (P = 0.012) and hallux (P = 0.036) and increased peak pressure (P < 0.001) and pressure time integrals (P = 0.005) at the midfoot. Compared to normouricemic control participants, participants with asymptomatic hyperuricemia demonstrated increased support base (P = 0.002), double support time (P < 0.001) and cadence (P = 0.028) and reduced swing time (P = 0.019) and single support time (P = 0.020) as well as increased pressure at the midfoot (P = 0.013), first metatarsal (P = 0.015) and second metatarsal (P = 0.007). During barefoot walking, people with gout walk slower with plantar pressure patterns suggestive of apropulsive and antalgic gait strategies. Individuals with asymptomatic hyperuricemia also demonstrate altered barefoot gait patterns when compared to normouricemic control participants. Clinicians may consider dynamic gait outcomes when assessing and managing foot and lower limb related pain and disability in individuals with gout and asymptomatic hyperuricemia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 20%
Student > Master 6 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Other 2 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 13%
Sports and Recreations 3 10%
Engineering 2 7%
Neuroscience 2 7%
Other 7 23%
Unknown 6 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2016.
All research outputs
#1,389,653
of 9,993,811 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#122
of 440 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,010
of 274,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#4
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,993,811 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 440 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,564 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.