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Probiotics' effects on the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
1 Facebook page
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

dimensions_citation
49 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
74 Mendeley
Title
Probiotics' effects on the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Published in
Critical Care, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/cc11398
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kai-xiong Liu, Ying-gang Zhu, Jing Zhang, Li-li Tao, Jae-Woo Lee, Xiao-dan Wang, Jie-ming Qu

Abstract

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: To evaluate the efficacy of probiotics in preventing nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients. METHODS: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and the Web of Science for relevant studies. Two reviewers extracted data and reviewed the quality of the studies independently. The primary outcome was the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia. Study-level data were pooled using a random-effects model when I2 was > 50% or a fixed-effects model when I2 was < 50%. RESULTS: Twelve randomized controlled studies with a total of 1,546 patients were considered. Pooled analysis showed a statistically significant reduction in nosocomial pneumonia rates due to probiotics (odd ratio [OR]= 0.75, 95% CI 0.57 to 0.97, P = 0.03, I2 = 46%). However, no statistically significant difference was found between groups regarding in-hospital mortality (OR = 0.93, 95% CI 0.50 to 1.74, P = 0.82, I2 = 51%), intensive care unit mortality (OR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.55 to 1.29, P = 0.43, I2 = 0%), duration of stay in the hospital (mean difference [MD] in days = -0.13, 95% CI -0.93 to 0.67, P = 0.75, I2 = 46%), or duration of stay in the intensive care units (MD = -0.72, 95% CI -1.73 to 0.29, P = 0.16, I2 = 68%). CONCLUSIONS: The use of probiotics was associated with a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients. However, large, well-designed, randomized, multi-center trials are needed to confirm any effects of probiotics clinical endpoints such as mortality and length of ICU and hospital stay.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 1%
France 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
Puerto Rico 1 1%
Unknown 67 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 15%
Other 10 14%
Student > Postgraduate 9 12%
Student > Master 8 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 9%
Other 21 28%
Unknown 8 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 11 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2019.
All research outputs
#4,105,009
of 16,594,163 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#2,611
of 5,202 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,964
of 129,475 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#16
of 102 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,594,163 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,202 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.4. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 129,475 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 102 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.