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Hip fracture risk in relation to vitamin D supplementation and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials and observational studies

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2010
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Title
Hip fracture risk in relation to vitamin D supplementation and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials and observational studies
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2010
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-331
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeffrey K C Lai, Robyn M Lucas, Mark S Clements, Andrew W Roddam, Emily Banks

Abstract

Vitamin D supplementation for fracture prevention is widespread despite conflicting interpretation of relevant randomised controlled trial (RCT) evidence. This study summarises quantitatively the current evidence from RCTs and observational studies regarding vitamin D, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and hip fracture risk. We undertook separate meta-analyses of RCTs examining vitamin D supplementation and hip fracture, and observational studies of serum vitamin D status (25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level), PTH and hip fracture. Results from RCTs were combined using the reported hazard ratios/relative risks (RR). Results from case-control studies were combined using the ratio of 25(OH)D and PTH measurements of hip fracture cases compared with controls. Original published studies of vitamin D, PTH and hip fracture were identified through PubMed and Web of Science databases, searches of reference lists and forward citations of key papers. The seven eligible RCTs identified showed no significant difference in hip fracture risk in those randomised to cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol supplementation versus placebo/control (RR = 1.13[95%CI 0.98-1.29]; 801 cases), with no significant difference between trials of <800 IU/day and > or = 800 IU/day. The 17 identified case-control studies found 33% lower serum 25(OH)D levels in cases compared to controls, based on 1903 cases. This difference was significantly greater in studies with population-based compared to hospital-based controls (chi(2)(1) (heterogeneity) = 51.02, p < 0.001) and significant heterogeneity was present overall (chi(2)(16) (heterogeneity) = 137.9, p < 0.001). Serum PTH levels in hip fracture cases did not differ significantly from controls, based on ten case-control studies with 905 cases (chi(2)(9) (heterogeneity) = 149.68, p < 0.001). Neither higher nor lower dose vitamin D supplementation prevented hip fracture. Randomised and observational data on vitamin D and hip fracture appear to differ. The reason for this is unclear; one possible explanation is uncontrolled confounding in observational studies. Post-fracture PTH levels are unrelated to hip fracture risk.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 1%
Unknown 77 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 15%
Student > Bachelor 12 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 10%
Researcher 7 9%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 15 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 40 51%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 3%
Chemistry 2 3%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 14 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2016.
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#6,857,395
of 7,921,887 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,435
of 6,836 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224,571
of 269,977 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#172
of 181 outputs
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