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San Huang Shel Shin Tang beta-cyclodextrin complex augmented the hepatoprotective effects against carbon tetrachloride-induced acute hepatotoxicity in rats

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, May 2016
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Title
San Huang Shel Shin Tang beta-cyclodextrin complex augmented the hepatoprotective effects against carbon tetrachloride-induced acute hepatotoxicity in rats
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12906-016-1127-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yu-Lan Yeh, Wei-Jen Ting, Wei-Wen Kuo, Hsi-Hsien Hsu, Yueh-Min Lin, Chia-Yao Shen, Chung-Ho Chang, Viswanadha Vijaya Padma, Yuhsin Tsai, Chih-Yang Huang

Abstract

San Huang Shel Shin Tang (SHSST) is a traditional herbal decoction used as a hepato-protective agent and is composed of Rheum officinale Baill, Scutellaria baicalnsis Geprgi and Coptis chinensis Franch (2:1:1 w/w). Beta-cyclodextrin (β-CD) modification may potentially increase the solubility and spectral properties of SHSST. In this research, the hepato-protective effects of unmodified SHSST, β-CD modified SHSST complex (SHSSTc) and silymarin were evaluated in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced acute hepatotoxicity in rats. SHHSTc (40 mg/kg/day) and silymarin (100 mg/kg/day) both decreased the CCl4-induced cirrhosis pathway-related transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and apoptosis pathway-related caspase-8 protein expressions, but SHSST (40 mg/kg/day) did not reduce TGF-β and caspase-8 significantly . Moreover, SHHSTc (40 mg/kg/day) enhanced the activation of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) mediated survival pathway than the silymarin (100 mg/kg/day) to protect the liver from damage induced by CCl4. β-CD modification promotes hepato-protective effects of SHSST and reduces the required-dosage of the SHSST.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 17%
Unknown 5 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 2 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 17%
Student > Bachelor 1 17%
Librarian 1 17%
Professor 1 17%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 67%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 17%
Chemistry 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 May 2016.
All research outputs
#6,778,858
of 7,826,281 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1,682
of 1,947 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224,251
of 269,257 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#41
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,826,281 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,947 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.