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The osteoblast as an inflammatory cell: production of cytokines in response to bacteria and components of bacterial biofilms

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
12 Mendeley
Title
The osteoblast as an inflammatory cell: production of cytokines in response to bacteria and components of bacterial biofilms
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12891-016-1091-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ulrike Dapunt, Thomas Giese, Sabine Stegmaier, Arash Moghaddam, Gertrud Maria Hänsch

Abstract

Implant infections are a major complication in the field of orthopaedics. Bacteria attach to the implant-surface and form biofilm-colonies which makes them difficult to treat. Not only immune cells exclusively respond to bacterial challenges, but also local tissue cells are capable of participating in defense mechanisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of osteoblasts in the context of implant infections. Primary osteoblasts were cultivated and stimulated with free-swimming bacteria at 4 °C and 37 °C. Supernatants were harvested for ELISA and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines evaluated by RT-PCR. Bacterial binding to osteoblasts was evaluated using cytofluorometry and uptake was investigated by (3)H thymidine-labelling of bacteria. Osteoblasts were additionally stimulated with the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms, as well as components of the EPS; the bacterial heat shock protein GroEL in particular. We demonstrated that binding of bacteria to the osteoblast cell surface leads to an increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Bacteria are capable of surviving intracellular. Furthermore, osteoblasts do not only respond to free-swimming, planktonic bacteria, but also to components of the EPS, including lipoteichoic acid and the heat shock protein GroEL. In conclusion, local tissue cells, specifically osteoblasts, might contribute to the persistence of the inflammatory response associated with implant-infections.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 33%
Researcher 3 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 17%
Student > Master 2 17%
Unspecified 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 17%
Unspecified 2 17%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 8%
Other 2 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 December 2017.
All research outputs
#6,520,587
of 12,319,220 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,053
of 2,440 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#107,938
of 275,745 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#35
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,319,220 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,440 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,745 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.