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Variability in conditioned pain modulation predicts response to NSAID treatment in patients with knee osteoarthritis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, July 2016
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Title
Variability in conditioned pain modulation predicts response to NSAID treatment in patients with knee osteoarthritis
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12891-016-1124-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert R. Edwards, Andrew J. Dolman, Marc. O. Martel, Patrick H. Finan, Asimina Lazaridou, Marise Cornelius, Ajay D. Wasan

Abstract

Patients with painful knee osteoarthritis (OA) demonstrate hyperalgesia and altered pain-modulatory responses. While some prior work has demonstrated cross-sectional associations between laboratory and clinical pain measures, it is unknown whether individual variability in quantitative sensory testing (QST) responses at baseline can prospectively predict analgesic treatment responses. Patients with knee OA (n = 35) were compared on QST responses to a demographically-matched pain-free control group (n = 39), after which patients completed a month-long treatment study of diclofenac sodium topical gel (1 %), applied up to 4 times daily. OA patients demonstrated reduced pain thresholds at multiple anatomic sites, as well as reduced conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and enhanced temporal summation of pain. The most pain-sensitive patients tended to report the most intense and neuropathic OA pain. Following diclofenac treatment, the knee OA cohort showed a roughly 30 % improvement in pain, regardless of the presence or absence of neuropathic symptoms. Baseline CPM scores, an index of endogenous pain-inhibitory capacity, were prospectively associated with treatment-related changes in clinical pain. Specifically, participants with higher CPM at baseline (i.e., better functioning endogenous pain-inhibitory systems) showed more reduction in pain at the end of treatment (p < .05). These results support prior findings of amplified pain sensitivity and reduced pain-inhibition in OA patients. Moreover, the moderate to strong associations between laboratory-based measures of pain sensitivity and indices of clinical pain highlight the clinical relevance of QST in this sample. Finally, the prospective association between CPM and diclofenac response suggests that QST-based phenotyping may have utility in explaining inter-patient variability in long-term analgesic treatment outcomes. ClinicalTrials.Gov Identifier: NCT01383954 . Registered June 22, 2011.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 48 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 22%
Student > Master 10 20%
Unspecified 9 18%
Other 5 10%
Researcher 3 6%
Other 11 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 18 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Psychology 5 10%
Neuroscience 4 8%
Other 5 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2016.
All research outputs
#6,137,603
of 8,083,793 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,646
of 2,069 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#182,888
of 259,470 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#58
of 77 outputs
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