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Coping with tuberculosis and directly observed treatment: a qualitative study among patients from South India

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
108 Mendeley
Title
Coping with tuberculosis and directly observed treatment: a qualitative study among patients from South India
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1545-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vijayashree Yellappa, Pierre Lefèvre, Tullia Battaglioli, Devadasan Narayanan, Patrick Van der Stuyft

Abstract

In India, the Revised National TB control programme (RNTCP) offers free diagnosis and treatment for tuberculosis (TB), based on the Directly Observed Treatment Short course (DOTS) strategy. We conducted a qualitative study to explore the experience and consequences of having TB on patients enrolled in DOTS and their caretakers in Tumkur district, located in a southern state of India, Karnataka. We conducted 33 in-depth interviews on a purposive sample of TB patients from three groups: (1) patients who reached RNTCP directly on their own and took DOTS at RNTCP; (2) patients who were referred by private practitioners (PPs) to RNTCP and took DOTS at RNTCP; and (3) patients diagnosed by RNTCP and took DOTS from PPs. Data was analyzed using a thematic approach with the support of NVivo9. The study revealed that TB and DOTS have a large impact on patient's lives, which is often extended to the family and caretakers. The most vulnerable patients faced the most difficulty in accessing and completing DOTS. The family was the main source of support during patient's recovery. Patients residing in rural areas and, taking DOTS from the government facilities had to overcome many barriers to adhere to the DOTS therapy, such as long travelling distance to DOTS centers, inconvenient timings and unfavorable attitude of the RNTCP staff, when compared to patients who took DOTS from PPs. Advantages of taking DOTS from PPs cited by the patients were privacy, flexibility in timings, proximity and more immediate access to care. Patients and their family had to cope with stigmatization and fear and financial hardships that surfaced from TB and DOTS. Young patients living in urban areas were more worried about stigmatisation, than elderly patients living in rural areas. Patients who were referred by PPs experienced more financial problems compared to those who reached RNTCP services directly. Our study provided useful information about patient's needs and expectations while taking DOTS. The development of mechanisms within RNTCP towards patient centered care is needed to enable patients and caretakers cope with disease condition and adhere to DOTS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 <1%
Unknown 107 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 22%
Researcher 22 20%
Unspecified 15 14%
Student > Bachelor 13 12%
Student > Postgraduate 8 7%
Other 26 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 44 41%
Unspecified 22 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 18%
Social Sciences 8 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 12 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 February 2019.
All research outputs
#1,528,941
of 13,337,884 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#684
of 4,464 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,562
of 263,713 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#3
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,337,884 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,464 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,713 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.