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Environmental predictors of stunting among children under-five in Somalia: cross-sectional studies from 2007 to 2010

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, July 2016
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76 Mendeley
Title
Environmental predictors of stunting among children under-five in Somalia: cross-sectional studies from 2007 to 2010
Published in
BMC Public Health, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3320-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Damaris K. Kinyoki, James A. Berkley, Grainne M. Moloney, Elijah O. Odundo, Ngianga-Bakwin Kandala, Abdisalan M. Noor

Abstract

Stunting among children under five years old is associated with long-term effects on cognitive development, school achievement, economic productivity in adulthood and maternal reproductive outcomes. Accurate estimation of stunting and tools to forecast risk are key to planning interventions. We estimated the prevalence and distribution of stunting among children under five years in Somalia from 2007 to 2010 and explored the role of environmental covariates in its forecasting. Data from household nutritional surveys in Somalia from 2007 to 2010 with a total of 1,066 clusters covering 73,778 children were included. We developed a Bayesian hierarchical space-time model to forecast stunting by using the relationship between observed stunting and environmental covariates in the preceding years. We then applied the model coefficients to environmental covariates in subsequent years. To determine the accuracy of the forecasting, we compared this model with a model that used data from all the years with the corresponding environmental covariates. Rainfall (OR = 0.994, 95 % Credible interval (CrI): 0.993, 0.995) and vegetation cover (OR = 0.719, 95 % CrI: 0.603, 0.858) were significant in forecasting stunting. The difference in estimates of stunting using the two approaches was less than 3 % in all the regions for all forecast years. Stunting in Somalia is spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Rainfall and vegetation are major drivers of these variations. The use of environmental covariates for forecasting of stunting is a potentially useful and affordable tool for planning interventions to reduce the high burden of malnutrition in Somalia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sudan 1 1%
Unknown 75 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 20%
Lecturer 13 17%
Unspecified 12 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Other 20 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 18 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 21%
Social Sciences 9 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 11%
Environmental Science 6 8%
Other 19 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 August 2017.
All research outputs
#7,416,690
of 12,347,662 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,966
of 8,352 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#135,392
of 266,849 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#237
of 336 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,347,662 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,352 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,849 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 336 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.