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Housing equity for health equity: a rights-based approach to the control of Lassa fever in post-war Sierra Leone

Overview of attention for article published in BMC International Health and Human Rights, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 212)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
84 Mendeley
Title
Housing equity for health equity: a rights-based approach to the control of Lassa fever in post-war Sierra Leone
Published in
BMC International Health and Human Rights, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1472-698x-13-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

J Daniel Kelly, M Bailor Barrie, Rachel A Ross, Brian A Temple, Lina M Moses, Daniel G Bausch

Abstract

Poor quality housing is an infringement on the rights of all humans to a standard of living adequate for health. Among the many vulnerabilities of those without adequate shelter is the risk of disease spread by rodents and other pests. One such disease is Lassa fever, an acute and sometimes severe viral hemorrhagic illness endemic in West Africa. Lassa virus is maintained in the rodent Mastomys natalensis, commonly known as the "multimammate rat," which frequently invades the domestic environment, putting humans at risk of Lassa fever. The highest reported incidence of Lassa fever in the world is consistently in the Kenema District of Sierra Leone, a region that was at the center of Sierra Leone's civil war in which tens of thousands of lives were lost and hundreds of thousands of dwellings destroyed. Despite the end of the war in 2002, most of Kenema's population still lives in inadequate housing that puts them at risk of rodent invasion and Lassa fever. Furthermore, despite years of health education and village hygiene campaigns, the incidence of Lassa fever in Kenema District appears to be increasing. We focus on Lassa fever as a matter of human rights, proposing a strategy to improve housing quality, and discuss how housing equity has the potential to improve health equity and ultimately economic productivity in Sierra Leone. The manuscript is designed to spur discussion and action towards provision of housing and prevention of disease in one of the world's most vulnerable populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Nigeria 2 2%
Sierra Leone 1 1%
United Arab Emirates 1 1%
Armenia 1 1%
Unknown 77 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 26%
Researcher 20 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 11%
Student > Postgraduate 6 7%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Other 9 11%
Unknown 13 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 11%
Social Sciences 8 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 5%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 14 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 February 2015.
All research outputs
#182,583
of 4,800,224 outputs
Outputs from BMC International Health and Human Rights
#5
of 212 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,641
of 285,664 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC International Health and Human Rights
#1
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,800,224 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 212 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,664 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.