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Psychosocial factors associated with flourishing among Australian HIV-positive gay men

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychology, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#26 of 302)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
Title
Psychosocial factors associated with flourishing among Australian HIV-positive gay men
Published in
BMC Psychology, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40359-016-0154-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anthony Lyons, Wendy Heywood, Tomas Rozbroj

Abstract

Mental health outcomes among HIV-positive gay men are generally poorer than in the broader population. However, not all men in this population experience mental health problems. Although much is known about factors associated with depression and anxiety among HIV-positive gay men, little is known about factors associated with positive mental health. Such knowledge can be useful for optimizing well-being support programs for HIV-positive gay men. In this study, we examined flourishing, which broadly covers most aspects of positive mental health. A sample of 357 Australian HIV-positive gay men completed a survey on their mental health and well-being, including the Flourishing Scale. Given the lack of previous research, we explored a wide range of psychosocial factors, including demographics, stigma, discrimination, and social support, to identify key factors linked to flourishing. The sample showed a similar level of flourishing to those in general population samples. Several independent factors were found to be associated with flourishing outcomes. Those who were most likely to be flourishing tended to have low or no internalized HIV-related stigma, were employed, received higher levels of practical support, had a sense of companionship with others, and felt supported by family. These and other findings presented in this article may be used to help inform strategies for promoting optimal levels of mental health, and its associated general health benefits, among HIV-positive gay men.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 35%
Student > Master 16 35%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Unspecified 4 9%
Other 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 20 43%
Unspecified 7 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 15%
Social Sciences 6 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 11%
Other 8 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 August 2019.
All research outputs
#502,144
of 13,528,187 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychology
#26
of 302 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,304
of 263,185 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,528,187 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 302 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,185 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them