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Assessing the level of evidence on transfer and transition in young people with chronic conditions: protocol of a scoping review

Overview of attention for article published in Systematic Reviews, January 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
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3 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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21 Mendeley
Title
Assessing the level of evidence on transfer and transition in young people with chronic conditions: protocol of a scoping review
Published in
Systematic Reviews, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13643-016-0344-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mariela Acuña Mora, Philip Moons, Carina Sparud-Lundin, Ewa-Lena Bratt, Eva Goossens, Acuña Mora, Mariela, Moons, Philip, Sparud-Lundin, Carina, Bratt, Ewa-Lena, Goossens, Eva

Abstract

Life-long specialized care is of the utmost importance to safeguard longevity as well as the quality of life in children diagnosed with a chronic condition (CC). Provision of life-long care, however, infers transfers to different settings in line with person's development status. Young people with CC (10-25 years) will transfer care from a pediatric towards an adult-oriented care setting. As a transfer of care is associated with a change of care context, healthcare team, responsibilities, expectations, and roles, patients need to be prepared for this alteration. One type of preparatory intervention is the provision of transitional care. Transition prepares adolescents for the responsibilities associated with adult care and age through support, education, skills demonstration, and guidance. The past decades, increasing attention has been paid towards the concept of transfer and transition, both in clinical practice and research. Numerous consensus papers have been established, emphasizing the need for the establishment of a transition program for young patients with CC. To date, it remains, however, unclear what the overall level of evidence is on transfer and transition in this population. This scoping review aims to analyze and determine the level of evidence of published literature on transfer and transition of young people diagnosed with CC. MEDLINE, CINAHL, Scopus, and Web of Science databases will be searched for relevant publications. Any publication in English, Spanish, German, or French, related to transfer and/or transition in young people with CC will be included. A three-staged approach will identify relevant papers, comprising systematic database searches, application of snowball method, and citation searching. Study selection will be performed through screening of titles/abstracts followed by a full-text assessment using a standardized selection form. Data extraction will be performed by two reviewers independently using a pilot-tested, standardized form. Descriptive statistics and content analysis will be applied to present the results. Bibliometric visualization techniques will be performed with VOS viewer®. Our review will map the overall level of evidence of published literature on transfer and transition in young people with CC. It will provide guidance for future research initiatives, clinical practice, and policy makers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Other 3 14%
Student > Master 3 14%
Lecturer 2 10%
Other 6 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 48%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 14%
Psychology 3 14%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 10%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 5%
Other 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2018.
All research outputs
#7,077,476
of 13,087,494 outputs
Outputs from Systematic Reviews
#765
of 1,101 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,890
of 265,243 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Systematic Reviews
#22
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,087,494 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,101 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,243 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.