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Evaluation of the inhibition of carbohydrate hydrolysing enzymes, antioxidant activity and polyphenolic content of extracts of ten African Ficus species (Moraceae) used traditionally to treat diabetes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, May 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

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98 Mendeley
Title
Evaluation of the inhibition of carbohydrate hydrolysing enzymes, antioxidant activity and polyphenolic content of extracts of ten African Ficus species (Moraceae) used traditionally to treat diabetes
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, May 2013
DOI 10.1186/1472-6882-13-94
Pubmed ID
Authors

Oyinlola O Olaokun, Lyndy J McGaw, Jacobus N Eloff, Vinny Naidoo

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Some Ficus species have been used in traditional African medicine in the treatment ofdiabetes. The antidiabetic potential of certain species has been confirmed in vivo but themechanism of activity remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine the activityand to investigate the mechanism of antidiabetic activity of ten selected Ficus species throughinhibition of a-amylase and a-glucosidase activity, and the possible relationship betweenthese activities, the total polyphenolic content and the antioxidant activity. METHODS: Dried acetone leaf extracts were reconstituted with appropriate solvents and used todetermine total polyphenolic content antioxidant activity, a-amylase and a-glucosidaseinhibitory activity. RESULTS: The crude acetone extract of F. lutea had the highest polyphenolic content (56.85 +/- 1.82 mgGAE/g of dry material) and the strongest antioxidant activity with a TEAC value of 4.80 +/- 0.90. The antioxidant activity of the acetone extracts of the Ficus species may not be ascribedto total polyphenolic content alone. The crude extract at a concentration of 0.5 mg/ml of F.lutea (64.3 +/- 3.6%) had the best a-glucosidase (sucrase) inhibitory activity. The EC50 of F.lutea (290 +/- 111 ug/ml) was not significantly different from that of F. sycomorus (217 +/- 69 ug/ml). The a-amylase inhibitory activity of F. lutea (95.4 +/- 1.2%) at a concentration of 1mg/ml was the highest among the Ficus species screened. The EC50 for F. lutea (9.42 +/- 2.01 ug/ml), though the highest, was not significantly different (p?0.05) from that of F.craterostoma and F. natalensis. It was apparent that the crude acetone extract of F. lutea is apartially un-competitive inhibitor of a-amylase and a-glucosidase. Based on correlationcoefficients polyphenolics may be responsible for a-glucosidase activity but probably not fora-amylase activity. CONCLUSION: Antidiabetic activity potential via inhibition of a-amylase and a-glucosidase was discoveredin Ficus lutea which has not been previously reported. The acetone extract of the leaves washigh in total polyphenolic content and antioxidant activity, and was a potent inhibitor of a-amylase activity. Research is underway to isolate the active compound(s) responsible for theantidiabetic activity and to confirm the in vitro antidiabetic activity and to investigate in vitrotoxicity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
Unknown 96 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 28%
Student > Master 23 23%
Student > Bachelor 13 13%
Researcher 7 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 22 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 35 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 13%
Chemistry 12 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 9 9%
Other 16 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2013.
All research outputs
#3,633,276
of 7,820,613 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#893
of 1,944 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,260
of 118,923 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#38
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,820,613 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,944 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 118,923 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.