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The evolution of the medical workforce in Cape Verde since independence in 1975

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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19 Mendeley
Title
The evolution of the medical workforce in Cape Verde since independence in 1975
Published in
Human Resources for Health, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12960-017-0180-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. P. Delgado, A. C. Tolentino, P. Ferrinho

Abstract

Cape Verdean doctors have always graduated abroad. The first experience of pre-graduate medical education in Cape Verde begun in October 2015. Counting how many doctors Cape Verde has, knowing who they are, and knowing how they are distributed are very important to help fine-tune the medical training. The aim of this study is to analyze the evolution of the medical workforce in Cape Verde to support medical education implementation. Secondary data on doctors, from July 1975 until December 2014, collected from the Ministry of Health, were entered into an SPSS 20 database and studied by a simple descriptive statistical analysis. The database included data on 401 medical doctors. There was a predominance of females (n = 218; 54.4%). The overwhelming majority (n = 378; 94.3%) graduated from 5 of the 17 countries that contributed to the training of Cape Verdean doctors. All the islands of this archipelago country contributed to the 324 (80.8%) doctors born in the country. Of the 272 doctors still active in December 2014, 119 (43.6%) were general practitioners and 153 (56.4%) had specialized in one of the 31 specialties. The national ratio of doctors per 10 000 inhabitants was 5.25, but the reality varied significantly among islands. About one third of the doctors (n = 86; 32%) were at the primary care level, 38 (14%) at the secondary care level, and 144 (52%) in central hospitals. In 2053, all active physicians in 2014 will already be retired. This is a unique study of the evolution of the medical workforce of a country over 40 years, from the first day of independence. The study illustrates the importance of international collaborations, particularly of Cuba, in sustaining the medical workforce in Cape Verde. It is an example of how this collaboration was used to equip the country with doctors in an increasingly more equitable distribution across all islands. The study further illustrates the progressive feminization of the medical workforce. The study clarifies the effort required from the emerging medical faculty to supply the national health system with the needed number of doctors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 26%
Researcher 3 16%
Student > Bachelor 3 16%
Student > Postgraduate 1 5%
Lecturer 1 5%
Other 6 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 42%
Social Sciences 3 16%
Unspecified 2 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Computer Science 1 5%
Other 4 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2017.
All research outputs
#4,212,254
of 9,000,236 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#495
of 589 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,886
of 309,075 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#21
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,000,236 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 52nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 589 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,075 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.