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The optic chiasm: a turning point in the evolution of eye/hand coordination

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, July 2013
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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4 X users
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1 YouTube creator

Citations

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82 Mendeley
Title
The optic chiasm: a turning point in the evolution of eye/hand coordination
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, July 2013
DOI 10.1186/1742-9994-10-41
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matz Larsson

Abstract

The primate visual system has a uniquely high proportion of ipsilateral retinal projections, retinal ganglial cells that do not cross the midline in the optic chiasm. The general assumption is that this developed due to the selective advantage of accurate depth perception through stereopsis. Here, the hypothesis that the need for accurate eye-forelimb coordination substantially influenced the evolution of the primate visual system is presented. Evolutionary processes may change the direction of retinal ganglial cells. Crossing, or non-crossing, in the optic chiasm determines which hemisphere receives visual feedback in reaching tasks. Each hemisphere receives little tactile and proprioceptive information about the ipsilateral hand. The eye-forelimb hypothesis proposes that abundant ipsilateral retinal projections developed in the primate brain to synthesize, in a single hemisphere, visual, tactile, proprioceptive, and motor information about a given hand, and that this improved eye-hand coordination and optimized the size of the brain. If accurate eye-hand coordination was a major factor in the evolution of stereopsis, stereopsis is likely to be highly developed for activity in the area where the hands most often operate.The primate visual system is ideally suited for tasks within arm's length and in the inferior visual field, where most manual activity takes place. Altering of ocular dominance in reaching tasks, reduced cross-modal cuing effects when arms are crossed, response of neurons in the primary motor cortex to viewed actions of a hand, multimodal neuron response to tactile as well as visual events, and extensive use of multimodal sensory information in reaching maneuvers support the premise that benefits of accurate limb control influenced the evolution of the primate visual system. The eye-forelimb hypothesis implies that evolutionary change toward hemidecussation in the optic chiasm provided parsimonious neural pathways in animals developing frontal vision and visually guided forelimbs, and also suggests a new perspective on vision convergence in prey and predatory animals.

X Demographics

X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 1%
United States 1 1%
France 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
Unknown 78 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 21 26%
Researcher 13 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 13%
Student > Master 9 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 5%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 13 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 20%
Neuroscience 11 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 12%
Psychology 9 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Other 18 22%
Unknown 15 18%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 January 2023.
All research outputs
#8,461,735
of 25,872,466 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#396
of 703 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,616
of 208,909 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#11
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,872,466 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 66th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 703 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.3. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,909 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.