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The airbag problem–a potential culprit for bench-to-bedside translational efforts: relevance for Alzheimer’s disease

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Neuropathologica Communications, September 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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53 Mendeley
Title
The airbag problem–a potential culprit for bench-to-bedside translational efforts: relevance for Alzheimer’s disease
Published in
Acta Neuropathologica Communications, September 2013
DOI 10.1186/2051-5960-1-62
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dimitrije Krstic, Irene Knuesel

Abstract

For the last 20 years, the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" has dominated research aimed at understanding, preventing, and curing Alzheimer's disease (AD). During that time researchers have acquired an enormous amount of data and have been successful, more than 300 times, in curing the disease in animal model systems by treatments aimed at clearing amyloid deposits. However, to date similar strategies have not been successful in human AD patients. Hence, before rushing into further clinical trials with compounds that aim at lowering amyloid-beta (Aβ) levels in increasingly younger people, it would be of highest priority to re-assess the initial assumption that accumulation of Aβ in the brain is the primary pathological event driving AD. Here we question this assumption by highlighting experimental evidence in support of the alternative hypothesis suggesting that APP and Aβ are part of a neuronal stress/injury system, which is up-regulated to counteract inflammation/oxidative stress-associated neurodegeneration that could be triggered by a brain injury, chronic infections, or a systemic disease. In AD, this protective program may be overridden by genetic and other risk factors, or its maintenance may become dysregulated during aging. Here, we provide a hypothetical example of a hypothesis-driven correlation between car accidents and airbag release in analogy to the evolution of the amyloid focus and as a way to offer a potential explanation for the failure of the AD field to translate the success of amyloid-related therapeutic strategies in experimental models to the clinic.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Korea, Republic of 1 2%
Unknown 50 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 28%
Researcher 12 23%
Student > Master 5 9%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 9 17%
Unknown 4 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 38%
Neuroscience 9 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Chemistry 2 4%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 7 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 March 2014.
All research outputs
#6,465,622
of 12,654,234 outputs
Outputs from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#310
of 601 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,431
of 161,198 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,654,234 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 601 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 161,198 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them