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Long-term outcomes of liver transplantation in patients with hepatitis C infection are not affected by HCV positivity of a donor

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Gastroenterology, November 2016
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Title
Long-term outcomes of liver transplantation in patients with hepatitis C infection are not affected by HCV positivity of a donor
Published in
BMC Gastroenterology, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12876-016-0551-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Stepanova, Mehmet Sayiner, Leyla de Avila, Zahra Younoszai, Andrei Racila, Zobair M. Younossi

Abstract

The use of HCV-positive livers for HCV-positive recipients is becoming more common. Our aim is to evaluate long-term outcomes in liver transplant recipients transplanted with HCV antibody-positive organs. From the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (1995-2013), we selected all adult liver transplant recipients with HCV, and cross-sectionally compared long-term graft loss and mortality rates between those who were transplanted from HCV antibody-positive (HCV+) vs. HCV antibody-negative donors. We included 33,668 HCV+ liver transplant recipients (54.0 ± 7.7 years old, 74.1% male, 71.0% white, 23.6% with liver malignancy). Of those, 5.7% (N = 1930) were transplanted from HCV+ donors; the proportion gradually increased from 2.9% in 1995 to 9.4% in 2013. Patients who were transplanted from HCV+ positive donors were more likely to be discharged alive after transplantation (95.4% vs. 93.9%, p = 0.006), but this difference was completely accounted for by a greater proportion of HCV+ donors in more recent study years (p = 0.10 after adjustment for the transplant year). After transplantation, both mortality in HCV patients transplanted from HCV+ donors (12.5% in 1 year, 24.2% in 3 years, 33.0% in 5 years) and the graft loss rate (2.2% in 1 year, 4.8% in 3 years, 7.5% in 5 years) were similar to those in HCV patients transplanted from HCV-negative donors (all p > 0.05). Over the past two decades, the use of HCV+ organs for liver transplantation has tripled. Despite this, the long-term outcomes of HCV+ liver transplant recipients transplanted from HCV+ donors were not different from those who were transplanted with HCV-negative organs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 7 32%
Researcher 4 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Professor 2 9%
Other 2 9%
Other 4 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 68%
Unspecified 3 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2017.
All research outputs
#7,526,160
of 9,763,361 outputs
Outputs from BMC Gastroenterology
#530
of 742 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,523
of 262,676 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Gastroenterology
#5
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,763,361 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 742 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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