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Nurses who work in rural and remote communities in Canada: a national survey

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
Title
Nurses who work in rural and remote communities in Canada: a national survey
Published in
Human Resources for Health, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12960-017-0209-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martha L. P. MacLeod, Norma J. Stewart, Judith C. Kulig, Penny Anguish, Mary Ellen Andrews, Davina Banner, Leana Garraway, Neil Hanlon, Chandima Karunanayake, Kelley Kilpatrick, Irene Koren, Julie Kosteniuk, Ruth Martin-Misener, Nadine Mix, Pertice Moffitt, Janna Olynick, Kelly Penz, Larine Sluggett, Linda Van Pelt, Erin Wilson, Lela Zimmer

Abstract

In Canada, as in other parts of the world, there is geographic maldistribution of the nursing workforce, and insufficient attention is paid to the strengths and needs of those providing care in rural and remote settings. In order to inform workforce planning, a national study, Nursing Practice in Rural and Remote Canada II, was conducted with the rural and remote regulated nursing workforce (registered nurses, nurse practitioners, licensed or registered practical nurses, and registered psychiatric nurses) with the intent of informing policy and planning about improving nursing services and access to care. In this article, the study methods are described along with an examination of the characteristics of the rural and remote nursing workforce with a focus on important variations among nurse types and regions. A cross-sectional survey used a mailed questionnaire with persistent follow-up to achieve a stratified systematic sample of 3822 regulated nurses from all provinces and territories, living outside of the commuting zones of large urban centers and in the north of Canada. Rural workforce characteristics reported here suggest the persistence of key characteristics noted in a previous Canada-wide survey of rural registered nurses (2001-2002), namely the aging of the rural nursing workforce, the growth in baccalaureate education for registered nurses, and increasing casualization. Two thirds of the nurses grew up in a community of under 10 000 people. While nurses' levels of satisfaction with their nursing practice and community are generally high, significant variations were noted by nurse type. Nurses reported coming to rural communities to work for reasons of location, interest in the practice setting, and income, and staying for similar reasons. Important variations were noted by nurse type and region. The proportion of the rural nursing workforce in Canada is continuing to decline in relation to the proportion of the Canadian population in rural and remote settings. Survey results about the characteristics and practice of the various types of nurses can support workforce planning to improve nursing services and access to care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 26%
Student > Master 7 17%
Unspecified 7 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Researcher 4 10%
Other 9 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 16 38%
Unspecified 9 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 17%
Social Sciences 4 10%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 5 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 July 2018.
All research outputs
#1,901,526
of 13,272,830 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#266
of 722 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,637
of 266,167 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#4
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,272,830 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 722 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,167 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.