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Assessing the effect of patient screening and isolation on curtailing Clostridium difficile infection in hospital settings

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
14 Mendeley
Title
Assessing the effect of patient screening and isolation on curtailing Clostridium difficile infection in hospital settings
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2494-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sara Maghdoori, Seyed M. Moghadas

Abstract

Patient screening at the time of hospital admission is not recommended as a routine practice, but may be an important strategy for containment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in hospital settings. We sought to investigate the effect of patient screening in the presence of asymptomatic carriers and in the context of imperfect patient isolation. We developed and parameterized a stochastic simulation model for the transmission dynamics of CDI in a hospital ward. We found that the transmission of CDI in the hospital, either through asymptomatic carriers or as a results of ineffective implementation of infection control practices, at the time of hospital admission. The results show that, for a sufficiently high reproduction number of CDI, the disease can persist within a hospital setting in the presence of in-ward transmission, even when there are no asymptomatically colonized patients at the time of hospital admission. Our findings have significant public health and clinical implications, especially in light of the emergence and community spread of hypervirulent CDI strains with enhanced transmission rates and toxin production. Rapid detection of colonized patients remains an important component of CDI control, especially in the context of asymptomatic transmission. Screening of in-hospital patients with potential exposure to colonized patients or contaminated environment and equipment can help reduce the rates of silent transmission of CDI through asymptomatic carriers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 21%
Student > Postgraduate 3 21%
Unspecified 2 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 14%
Student > Bachelor 1 7%
Other 3 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 50%
Unspecified 2 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Decision Sciences 1 7%
Other 2 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 October 2018.
All research outputs
#2,208,702
of 13,600,958 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#714
of 5,069 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,926
of 266,814 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,600,958 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,069 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,814 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them