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Seasonality of acquisition of respiratory bacterial pathogens in young children with cystic fibrosis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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13 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
Title
Seasonality of acquisition of respiratory bacterial pathogens in young children with cystic fibrosis
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2511-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kevin J. Psoter, Anneclaire J. De Roos, Jon Wakefield, Jonathan D. Mayer, Margaret Rosenfeld

Abstract

Seasonal variations are often observed for respiratory tract infections; however, limited information is available regarding seasonal patterns of acquisition of common cystic fibrosis (CF)-related respiratory pathogens. We previously reported differential seasonal acquisition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in young children with CF and no such variation for methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus acquisition. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare the seasonal incidence of acquisition of other respiratory bacterial pathogens in young children with CF. We conducted a retrospective study to describe and compare the seasonal incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, and Haemophilus influenzae acquisition in young CF patients residing in the U.S. using the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation National Patient Registry, 2003-2009. Log-linear overdispersed Poisson regression was used to evaluate seasonal acquisition of each of these pathogens. A total of 4552 children met inclusion criteria. During follow-up 910 (20%), 1161 (26%), 228 (5%), and 2148 (47%) children acquired MRSA, S. maltophilia, A. xylosoxidans and H. influenzae, respectively. Compared to winter season, MRSA was less frequently acquired in spring (Incidence Rate Ratio [IRR]: 0.79; 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 0.65, 0.96) and summer (IRR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.57, 0.84) seasons. Similarly, a lower rate of A. xylosoxidans acquisition was observed in spring (IRR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.39, 0.89). For H. influenzae, summer (IRR: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.78, 0.99) and autumn (IRR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.88) seasons were associated with lower acquisition rates compared to winter. No seasonal variation was observed for S. maltophilia acquisition. Acquisition of CF-related respiratory pathogens displays seasonal variation in young children with CF, with the highest rate of acquisition for most pathogens occurring in the winter. Investigation of factors underlying these observed associations may contribute to our understanding of the aetiology of these infections and guide future infection control strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 25%
Student > Master 5 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 21%
Unspecified 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 25%
Unspecified 5 21%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 13%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Other 5 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 September 2017.
All research outputs
#1,494,765
of 11,732,401 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#489
of 4,377 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,512
of 272,076 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#19
of 106 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,732,401 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,377 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,076 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 106 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.