↓ Skip to main content

Employment-related difficulties and distressed living condition in patients with hepatitis B virus: A qualitative and quantitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
Title
Employment-related difficulties and distressed living condition in patients with hepatitis B virus: A qualitative and quantitative study
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4416-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Taeko Oka, Hiroaki Enoki, Yukari Tokimoto, Teruaki Kawanishi, Meguru Minami, Takahiro Okuizumi, Kiyohiko Katahira

Abstract

In Japan, an estimated 400,000 people have the hepatitis B virus (HBV), many of whom were infected as a result of group vaccinations. People with HBV face many challenges, including disease progression, employment-related difficulties, and increased medical expenses. The relationship between HBV victims' daily life suffering and poverty associated with HBV-related employment changes has not been examined. We aimed to clarify the employment-related hardships experienced by Japanese HBV victims, and the relationships between these hardships and daily life suffering, including poverty, through qualitative and quantitative analyses. The study population comprised 11,046 people infected with HBV via group vaccination who filed lawsuits in Japan's District Courts by 2014. First, we conducted a qualitative study (2013) using the KJ method, with 107 participants (68 men, mean age 58.9 years; 39 women, mean age 55.3 years). Semi-structured interviews were conducted covering participants' current condition, treatment, medical expenses, and life difficulties (employment- and family-related problems). In 2014, we conducted a quantitative study. We mailed questionnaires to the entire study population, investigating the topics covered in the interviews (response rate 60.1%). Daily life suffering was determined by responses to the question "What do you think about your everyday life situation?" We performed binomial logistic regression analyses to verify the relationships between daily life suffering and disease, employment, and income status. Interview data were integrated into seven islands: intention to work, lack of understanding of HBV in the workplace, inability to buy life insurance, burden due to medical expenses, life failure, dissatisfaction with the system, and wishing for life balance. The quantitative analyses showed significant positive correlations between daily life suffering and liver cancer (odds ratio [OR] 1.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.00-2.17, p < 0.05), being a part-time/casual employee (OR 1.46, 95% CI: 1.11-1.92 p < 0.01), and an income below the national average (p < 0.01). We qualitatively and quantitatively demonstrated that employment-related hardships and daily life suffering are prevalent in people with HBV. Their likelihood of experiencing distress in daily life increases with increasing medical expenses, insecure employment status (e.g., job loss) attributable to HBV, and the resulting poverty.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 27%
Student > Master 3 27%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 18%
Student > Postgraduate 1 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 36%
Social Sciences 2 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 18%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Other 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2017.
All research outputs
#6,725,981
of 11,370,524 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,406
of 7,765 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#136,299
of 266,597 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#149
of 203 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,370,524 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,765 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,597 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 203 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.