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A comparison of intimate partner and other sexual assault survivors’ use of different types of specialized hospital-based violence services

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Women's Health, August 2017
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Title
A comparison of intimate partner and other sexual assault survivors’ use of different types of specialized hospital-based violence services
Published in
BMC Women's Health, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12905-017-0408-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Janice Du Mont, Maryam Woldeyohannes, Sheila Macdonald, Daisy Kosa, Linda Turner

Abstract

Little is known about the health service utilization of women sexually assaulted by their intimate partners, as compared with those sexually assaulted by other perpetrators. To address this gap, we describe the use of acute care services post-victimization, as well as a broad range of survivor and assault characteristics, across women assaulted by current or former intimate partners, other known assailants, and strangers. Information was gathered from individuals presenting to 30 hospital-based sexual assault and domestic violence treatment centres using a standardized data collection form. We examined the data from 619 women 16 years of age or older who were sexually assaulted by one assailant. Women sexually assaulted by a current or former intimate partner were less likely than those assaulted by another known assailant or a stranger to have been administered emergency contraception (p < 0.001) or prophylaxis for sexually transmitted infections (p < 0.001), and counselled for potential use of HIV post-exposure prophylaxis (p < 0.001). However, these women were more likely than those in the other two groups to have had their injuries documented with photographs (p < 0.001), have undergone a risk assessment (p = 0.008), and/or have engaged in safety planning (p < 0.001). Women sexually assaulted by current or former intimate partners utilized services offered by sexual assault and domestic violence treatment centres differently than those assaulted by other known assailants and strangers. This may reflect their different health, forensic, and social needs, as well as the importance of offering care tailored to their particular circumstances.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Student > Master 7 13%
Other 6 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 11%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 11 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 23%
Social Sciences 11 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 16%
Psychology 4 7%
Computer Science 2 4%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 13 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2017.
All research outputs
#10,427,939
of 13,654,545 outputs
Outputs from BMC Women's Health
#621
of 788 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#181,633
of 266,898 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Women's Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,654,545 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 788 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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