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The taming of an impossible child: a standardized all-in approach to the phylogeny of Hymenoptera using public database sequences

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, August 2011
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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6 X users
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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57 Dimensions

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174 Mendeley
Title
The taming of an impossible child: a standardized all-in approach to the phylogeny of Hymenoptera using public database sequences
Published in
BMC Biology, August 2011
DOI 10.1186/1741-7007-9-55
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ralph S Peters, Benjamin Meyer, Lars Krogmann, Janus Borner, Karen Meusemann, Kai Schütte, Oliver Niehuis, Bernhard Misof

Abstract

Enormous molecular sequence data have been accumulated over the past several years and are still exponentially growing with the use of faster and cheaper sequencing techniques. There is high and widespread interest in using these data for phylogenetic analyses. However, the amount of data that one can retrieve from public sequence repositories is virtually impossible to tame without dedicated software that automates processes. Here we present a novel bioinformatics pipeline for downloading, formatting, filtering and analyzing public sequence data deposited in GenBank. It combines some well-established programs with numerous newly developed software tools (available at http://software.zfmk.de/).

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 174 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 5%
Germany 6 3%
Mexico 3 2%
Netherlands 2 1%
Brazil 2 1%
Sweden 2 1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Other 7 4%
Unknown 141 81%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 45 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 20%
Student > Master 23 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 16 9%
Professor 13 7%
Other 26 15%
Unknown 16 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 123 71%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 10%
Environmental Science 3 2%
Arts and Humanities 2 1%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 1%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 23 13%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 July 2016.
All research outputs
#6,959,052
of 25,986,827 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#30
of 30 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,592
of 135,504 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#9
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,986,827 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 30 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one scored the same or higher as 0 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 135,504 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.