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Money for medication: a randomized controlled study on the effectiveness of financial incentives to improve medication adherence in patients with psychotic disorders

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, December 2014
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Title
Money for medication: a randomized controlled study on the effectiveness of financial incentives to improve medication adherence in patients with psychotic disorders
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12888-014-0343-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ernst L Noordraven, Charlotte H Audier, Anton BP Staring, Andre I Wierdsma, Peter Blanken, Bas EA van der Hoorn, Leona Hakkaart-van Roijen, Cornelis L Mulder

Abstract

BackgroundNon-adherence with antipsychotic medication is a frequently occurring problem, particularly among patients with psychotic disorders. Prior research has generally shown encouraging results for interventions based on `Contingency Management¿ (CM), in which desirable behaviour is encouraged by providing rewards contingent upon the behaviour. However, little is known about the application of CM on medication adherence in patients with psychotic disorders. An earlier pilot-study by our study group showed promising results in reducing admission days and increasing adherence. The current study is a randomized controlled trial concerning the effectiveness of a CM procedure called `Money for Medication¿ (M4M), aimed at improving adherence with antipsychotic depot medication in psychotic disorder patients.Methods/DesignOutpatients (n =168) with a psychotic disorder will be randomly assigned to either the experimental group (n =84), receiving a financial reward for each accepted antipsychotic medication depot, or the control group (n =84), receiving treatment as usual without financial rewards. Patients are included regardless of their previous adherence. The intervention has a duration of twelve months. During the subsequent six months follow-up, the effects of discontinuing the intervention on depot acceptance will be assessed.The primary goal of this study is to assess the effectiveness of providing financial incentives for improving adherence with antipsychotic depot medication (during and after the intervention). The primary outcome measure is the percentage of accepted depots in comparison to prescription. Secondary, we will consider alternative measures of medication acceptance, i.e. the longest period of uninterrupted depot acceptance and the time expired before depot is taken. Additionally, the effectiveness of the experimental intervention will be assessed in terms of psychosocial functioning, substance use, medication side-effects, quality of life, motivation, cost-utility and patients¿ and clinicians¿ attitudes towards M4M.DiscussionThis RCT assesses the effectiveness and side-effects of financial incentives in improving adherence with antipsychotic depot medication in patients with psychotic disorders. This study is designed to assess whether M4M is an effective intervention to improve patients¿ acceptance of their antipsychotic depot medication and to examine how this intervention contributes to patients¿ functioning and wellbeing.Trial Registration: NTR2350.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 2%
Unknown 64 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 25%
Student > Master 12 18%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 9%
Other 5 8%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 11 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 20 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 28%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 16 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 December 2014.
All research outputs
#3,133,244
of 4,580,192 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#1,251
of 1,506 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,484
of 147,349 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#75
of 91 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,580,192 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,506 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 91 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.