↓ Skip to main content

Extract of Ginkgo biloba exacerbates liver metastasis in a mouse colon cancer Xenograft model

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, December 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
12 Mendeley
Title
Extract of Ginkgo biloba exacerbates liver metastasis in a mouse colon cancer Xenograft model
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12906-017-2014-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Huan Wang, Xia Wu, Stephane Lezmi, Qian Li, William G. Helferich, Yueqing Xu, Hong Chen

Abstract

Metastasis refers to the spread of a primary tumor cell from the primary site to other locations in the body and it is generally associated with the severity of a tumor. Extract of Ginkgo biloba (EGb) contains various bioactive compounds and it exerts beneficial effects including improvements in brain function and reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, increased risk of thyroid and liver cancers by EGb have been reported in animals. A colon cancer metastasis model was established using intrasplenic injection of a human colon cancer cell line, SW620-luc in athymic mice to investigate the potential impact of EGb on colon cancer progression. After tumor establishment, EGb was intraperitonically injected daily for 5 wks. EGb significantly increased the rate of metastasis in mouse liver and decreased the number of necrotic and apoptotic cells in the metastatic liver when compared to the control. Meanwhile, EGb significantly induced proliferation of tumor cells in the metastatic liver, indicated by increased staining of Ki67 and H3S10p. mRNA expression of genes involved in cell cycle, metastasis, apoptosis, and oxidative stress were altered by EGb treatment in livers with tumors. Moreover, EGb activated the stress-responsive MAPK pathways in the liver with metastatic tumors. EGb exacerbated liver metastasis in a mouse colon cancer metastasis model. This is potentially due to the increased tumor cell proliferation involving stimulated MAPK pathways.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 33%
Unspecified 3 25%
Other 2 17%
Researcher 1 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 25%
Unspecified 2 17%
Neuroscience 2 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 8%
Other 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 December 2017.
All research outputs
#10,864,955
of 12,259,388 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#2,041
of 2,485 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#284,439
of 342,744 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#237
of 313 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,259,388 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,485 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 342,744 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 313 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.