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Global medical education partnerships to expand specialty expertise: a case report on building neurology clinical and research capacity

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
Title
Global medical education partnerships to expand specialty expertise: a case report on building neurology clinical and research capacity
Published in
Human Resources for Health, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/1478-4491-12-75
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark Kaddumukasa, Elly Katabira, Robert A Salata, Marco A Costa, Edward Ddumba, Anthony Furlan, Angelina Kakooza-Mwesige, Moses R Kamya, James Kayima, Chris T Longenecker, Harriet Mayanja-Kizza, Charles Mondo, Shirley Moore, Svetlana Pundik, Nelson Sewankambo, Daniel I Simon, Kathleen A Smyth, Martha Sajatovic

Abstract

Neurological disorders are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan African, but resources for their management are scarce. Collaborations between training institutions in developed and resource-limited countries can be a successful model for supporting specialty medical education and increasing clinical and research capacity.Case report: This report describes a US National Institute of Health (NIH) funded Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) to enhance expertise in neurology, developed between Makerere University College of Health Sciences in Kampala, Uganda, and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, OH, USA.This collaborative model is based on a successful medical education and research model that has been developed over the past two decades. The Ugandan and US teams have accumulated knowledge and 'lessons learned' that facilitate specialty expertise in cardiovascular and neurological conditions, which are widespread and associated with substantial disability in resource-limited countries. Strengths of the model include a focus on community health care settings and a strong research component. Key elements include strong local leadership; use of remote technology, templates to standardize performance; shared exchanges; mechanisms to optimize sustainability and of dissemination activities that expand impact of the original initiative. Efficient collaborations are further enhanced by external and institutional support, and can be sequentially refined.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sierra Leone 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 40 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 17%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Student > Postgraduate 4 10%
Student > Master 4 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 10%
Other 9 21%
Unknown 9 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 40%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 5%
Engineering 2 5%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 14 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 January 2015.
All research outputs
#2,239,723
of 5,040,289 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#321
of 396 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,354
of 177,238 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#18
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,040,289 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 54th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 396 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 177,238 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.