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Does azithromycin given to women in labour decrease ocular bacterial infection in neonates? A double-blind, randomized trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2017
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2 tweeters

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25 Mendeley
Title
Does azithromycin given to women in labour decrease ocular bacterial infection in neonates? A double-blind, randomized trial
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2909-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah E. Burr, Bully Camara, Claire Oluwalana, Ebrima Bojang, Christian Bottomley, Abdoulie Bojang, Robin L. Bailey, Umberto D’Alessandro, Anna Roca

Abstract

Vertical transmission can result in neonatal infection and disease. Reducing the transmission of bacterial pathogens from mother to infant may be an effective means of preventing neonatal infection, including bacterial conjunctivitis. In a double-blind, randomized trial, we assessed the effect of administering a single dose of oral azithromycin to women in labour on bacterial colonization of the neonate. A reduction in purulent neonatal conjunctivitis was a secondary objective of the trial. Ocular samples were collected from the lower fornix of infants presenting with clinical signs of purulent conjunctivitis during the first eight weeks of life. Incidence of purulent conjunctivitis was compared between trial arms. Bacterial infection was assessed using PCR and incidence of purulent conjunctivitis due to bacteria was also compared between arms. Forty of 843 infants (4.7%) presented clinical signs of purulent conjunctivitis. No significant difference in incidence of purulent conjunctivitis was seen between azithromycin and placebo arms [4.3% (18/419) versus 5.2% (22/424), OR = 0.82, 95% CI (0.44,1.54), p = 0.628]. S. aureus was the most commonly identified pathogen, detected in 38% of cases. Incidence of purulent-conjunctivitis due to bacterial infection was lower in the azithromycin arm [1.2% (5/419) versus 3.8% (16/424), OR = 0.31, 95% CI (0.12-0.82), p = 0.025)]. The incidence of gram-positive bacteria was also lower in the azithromycin arm [1.0% (4/419) versus 3.3% (14/424), OR = 0.28, 95%CI (0.10-0.82), p = 0.029]. Oral azithromycin given to women during labour may have the potential to reduce the incidence of bacterial neonatal conjunctivitis. ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT01800942 , registration date 26 Feb 2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 20%
Unspecified 4 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 8 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 36%
Unspecified 5 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 8%
Other 3 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2019.
All research outputs
#7,930,810
of 13,160,482 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,440
of 4,892 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#199,845
of 382,554 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#308
of 652 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,160,482 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,892 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 382,554 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 652 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.