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Multimorbidity, health care utilization and costs in an elderly community-dwelling population: a claims data based observational study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
121 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
214 Mendeley
Title
Multimorbidity, health care utilization and costs in an elderly community-dwelling population: a claims data based observational study
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12913-015-0698-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Caroline Bähler, Carola A Huber, Beat Brüngger, Oliver Reich

Abstract

BackgroundChronic conditions and multimorbidity have become one of the main challenges in health care worldwide. However, data on the burden of multimorbidity are still scarce. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between multimorbidity and the health care utilization and costs in the Swiss community-dwelling population, taking into account several sociodemographic factors.MethodsThe study population consists of 229'493 individuals aged 65 or older who were insured in 2013 by the Helsana Group, the leading health insurer in Switzerland, covering all 26 Swiss cantons. Multimorbidity was defined as the presence of two or more chronic conditions of a list of 22 conditions that were identified using an updated measure of the Pharmacy-based Cost Group model. The number of consultations (total and divided by primary care physicians and specialists), the number of different physicians contacted, the type of physician contact (face-to-face, phone, and home visits), the number of hospitalisations and the length of stay were assessed separately for the multimorbid and non-multimorbid sample. The costs (total and divided by inpatient and outpatient costs) covered by the compulsory health insurance were calculated for both samples. Multiple linear regression modelling was conducted to adjust for influencing factors: age, sex, linguistic region, purchasing power, insurance plan, and nursing dependency.ResultsPrevalence of multimorbidity was 76.6%. The mean number of consultations per year was 15.7 in the multimorbid compared to 4.4 in the non-multimorbid sample. Total costs were 5.5 times higher in multimorbid patients. Each additional chronic condition was associated with an increase of 3.2 consultations and increased costs of 33%. Strong positive associations with utilization and costs were also found for nursing dependency. Multimorbid patients were 5.6 times more likely to be hospitalised. Furthermore, results revealed a significant age-gender interaction and a socioeconomic gradient.ConclusionsMultimorbidity is associated with substantial higher health care utilization and costs in Switzerland. Quantified data on the current burden of multimorbidity are fundamental for the management of patients in health service delivery systems and for health care policy debates about resource allocation. Strategies for a better coordination of multimorbid patients are urgently needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 214 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 2 <1%
India 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 210 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 41 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 18%
Researcher 30 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 9%
Student > Bachelor 15 7%
Other 40 19%
Unknown 30 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 93 43%
Nursing and Health Professions 28 13%
Social Sciences 20 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 5 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 2%
Other 25 12%
Unknown 39 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 February 2016.
All research outputs
#1,818,666
of 12,372,945 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#818
of 4,083 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,580
of 265,570 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#3
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,945 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,083 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,570 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.