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Survival and associated risk factors in patients with diabetes and amputations caused by infectious foot gangrene

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
38 Mendeley
Title
Survival and associated risk factors in patients with diabetes and amputations caused by infectious foot gangrene
Published in
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13047-017-0243-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yu-Yao Huang, Cheng-Wei Lin, Hui-Mei Yang, Shih-Yuan Hung, I-Wen Chen

Abstract

Infectious gangrene of the foot is a serious complication of diabetes that usually leads to a certain level of lower-extremity amputation (LEA). Nevertheless, the long-term survival and factors associated with mortality in such patients have yet to be elucidated. A total of 157 patients with type 2 diabetes who received treatment for infectious foot gangrene at a major diabetic foot center in Taiwan from 2002 to 2009 were enrolled, of whom 90 had major LEAs (above the ankle) and 67 had minor LEAs (below the ankle). Clinical data during treatment were used for the analysis of survival and LEA, and survival was tracked after treatment until December 2012. Of the 157 patients, 109 died, with a median survival time of 3.12 years and 5-year survival rate of 40%. Age [hazard ratio 1.04 (95% confidence interval 1.01-1.06)], and major LEA [1.80 (1.05-3.09)] were independent factors associated with mortality. Patients with minor LEAs had a better median survival than those with major LEAs (5.5 and 1.9 years, respectively, P < 0.01). An abnormal ankle-brachial index was an independent risk factor [odds ratio 3.12 (95% CI 1.18-8.24)] for a poor outcome (major LEA) after adjusting for age, smoking status, hypertension, major adverse cardiac events, and renal function. Efforts to limit amputations below the ankle resulted in better survival of patients with infectious foot gangrene. An abnormal ankle-brachial index may guide physicians to make appropriate decisions with regards to the amputation level.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 24%
Unspecified 6 16%
Student > Bachelor 6 16%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Other 9 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 34%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 24%
Unspecified 7 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Other 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2019.
All research outputs
#3,628,585
of 13,454,351 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#314
of 542 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,584
of 385,794 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#49
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,454,351 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 542 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 385,794 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.