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Relative contribution of various chronic diseases and multi-morbidity to potential disability among Dutch elderly

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
Title
Relative contribution of various chronic diseases and multi-morbidity to potential disability among Dutch elderly
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2820-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Riaan Botes, Karin M. Vermeulen, Janine Correia, Erik Buskens, Fanny Janssen

Abstract

The amount of time spent living with disease greatly influences elderly people's wellbeing, disability and healthcare costs, but differs by disease, age and sex. We assessed how various single and combined diseases differentially affect life years spent living with disease in Dutch elderly men and women (65+) over their remaining life course. Multistate life table calculations were applied to age and sex-specific disease prevalence, incidence and death rates for the Netherlands in 2007. We distinguished congestive heart failure, coronary heart disease (CHD), breast and prostate cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer, diabetes, COPD, stroke, dementia and osteoarthritis. Across ages 65, 70, 75, 80 and 85, CHD caused the most time spent living with disease for Dutch men (from 7.6 years at age 65 to 3.7 years at age 85) and osteoarthritis for Dutch women (from 11.7 years at age 65 to 4.8 years at age 85). Of the various co-occurrences of disease, the combination of diabetes and osteoarthritis led to the most time spent living with disease, for both men (from 11.2 years at age 65 to 4.9 -years at age 85) and women (from 14.2 years at age 65 to 6.0 years at age 85). Specific single and multi-morbid diseases affect men and women differently at different phases in the life course in terms of the time spent living with disease, and consequently, their potential disability. Timely sex and age-specific interventions targeting prevention of the single and combined diseases identified could reduce healthcare costs and increase wellbeing in elderly people.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 12 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Lecturer 4 11%
Researcher 4 11%
Other 3 8%
Other 9 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 17 46%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 27%
Psychology 3 8%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 September 2019.
All research outputs
#7,530,737
of 13,594,282 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,685
of 4,552 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#158,122
of 350,463 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,594,282 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,552 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 350,463 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them