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Mercury from chlor-alkali plants: measured concentrations in food product sugar

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health, January 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 1,502)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
2350 tweeters
facebook
84 Facebook pages
wikipedia
7 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors
pinterest
1 Pinner
q&a
1 Q&A thread
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
51 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
125 Mendeley
citeulike
7 CiteULike
Title
Mercury from chlor-alkali plants: measured concentrations in food product sugar
Published in
Environmental Health, January 2009
DOI 10.1186/1476-069x-8-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Renee Dufault, Blaise LeBlanc, Roseanne Schnoll, Charles Cornett, Laura Schweitzer, David Wallinga, Jane Hightower, Lyn Patrick, Walter J Lukiw

Abstract

Mercury cell chlor-alkali products are used to produce thousands of other products including food ingredients such as citric acid, sodium benzoate, and high fructose corn syrup. High fructose corn syrup is used in food products to enhance shelf life. A pilot study was conducted to determine if high fructose corn syrup contains mercury, a toxic metal historically used as an anti-microbial. High fructose corn syrup samples were collected from three different manufacturers and analyzed for total mercury. The samples were found to contain levels of mercury ranging from below a detection limit of 0.005 to 0.570 micrograms mercury per gram of high fructose corn syrup. Average daily consumption of high fructose corn syrup is about 50 grams per person in the United States. With respect to total mercury exposure, it may be necessary to account for this source of mercury in the diet of children and sensitive populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2,350 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 125 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 5%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Unknown 116 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 19%
Student > Bachelor 20 16%
Student > Master 19 15%
Other 15 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 7%
Other 25 20%
Unknown 13 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 17%
Environmental Science 16 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 6%
Chemistry 7 6%
Other 27 22%
Unknown 21 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1121. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 January 2023.
All research outputs
#10,835
of 22,994,508 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health
#5
of 1,502 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9
of 171,528 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,994,508 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,502 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 171,528 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.