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Leaving the emergency department without complete care: disparities in American Indian children

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, April 2018
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2 tweeters

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4 Mendeley
Title
Leaving the emergency department without complete care: disparities in American Indian children
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3092-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tess L. Weber, Katherine M. Ziegler, Anupam B. Kharbanda, Nathaniel R. Payne, Chad Birger, Susan E. Puumala

Abstract

Children who leave the emergency department (ED) without complete evaluation or care (LWCET) have poorer outcomes in general. Previous studies have found that American Indian (AI) children have higher rates of LWCET than other racial or ethnic groups. Therefore, this study aims to examine LWCET in AI children by exploring differences by ED location and utilization patterns. This is a retrospective cohort study of five EDs in the upper Midwest between June 2011 and May 2012. We included all visits by children aged 0-17 who identified as African American (AA), AI or White. Logistic regression was used to determine differences in LWCET by race and ED location controlling for other possible confounding factors including sex, age, insurance type, triage level, distance from ED, timing of visit, and ED activity level. LWCET occurred in 1.73% of 68,461 visits made by 47,228 children. The multivariate model revealed that AIs were more likely to LWCET compared to White children (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.62, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.30-2.03). There was no significant difference in LWCET between AA and White children. Other factors significantly associated with LWCET included triage level, distance from the ED, timing of visit, and ED activity level. Our results show that AI children have higher rates of LWCET compared to White children; this association is different from other racial minority groups. There are likely complex factors affecting LWCET in AI children throughout the upper Midwest, which necessitates further exploration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 50%
Student > Bachelor 1 25%
Unspecified 1 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 2 50%
Social Sciences 1 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2018.
All research outputs
#7,635,467
of 12,793,889 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,813
of 4,234 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,741
of 274,097 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,793,889 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,234 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,097 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them