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Surveillance of healthcare-associated infections in a neonatal intensive care unit in Italy during 2006–2010

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2015
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Title
Surveillance of healthcare-associated infections in a neonatal intensive care unit in Italy during 2006–2010
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0909-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Valeria Crivaro, Lidija Bogdanović, Maria Bagattini, Vita Dora Iula, Mariarosaria Catania, Francesco Raimondi, Maria Triassi, Raffaele Zarrilli

Abstract

Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are a frequent complication associated with hospitalization of infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe the results of surveillance of HAIs in a III level NICU in Naples, Italy during 2006-2010. The surveillance covered 1,699 neonates of all birth weight (BW) classes with > 2 days NICU stay. Infections were defined using standard Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definitions adapted to neonatal pathology and were considered to be healthcare-associated if they developed > 2 days after NICU admission. One hundred-fifty-three HAIs were diagnosed with a frequency of 9% and an incidence density of 3.5 per 1000 days of hospital stay. HAIs developed in all BW classes, but patients weighing ≤ 1000 g at birth were more affected with a decreasing trend from the lowest to the highest BW classes. Sepsis proved to be the most frequent infection (44.4%), followed by urinary tract infection (UTI) (28.8%), pneumonia (25.5%) and meningitis (1.3%). Device associated infections (i.e. central line-associated bloodstream infections (BSIs), umbilical catheter-associated BSI and ventilator associated pneumonias (VAPs) represented 64.1% of all HAIs. Most frequent pathogens responsible for all types of infections were: P. aeruginosa (17%), C. parapsilosis (16.3%), E. coli (13.1%), C. albicans (10.5%), non- extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) K. pneumoniae (7.8%), and coagulase-negative Staphylococci (5.2%). No microbiological diagnosis was achieved for 6.5% of infections. HAIs developed in all BW classes but low BW neonates were at major risk to acquire HAIs in our NICU. Use of central line-, umbilical-catheter and mechanical ventilation was associated with higher risk of infection. Our findings highlight the importance of an extensive surveillance approach in the NICU setting, which includes all BW classes of neonates and monitors infections associated with the use of medical devices.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 66 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 26%
Student > Postgraduate 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 8 12%
Unspecified 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Other 15 23%
Unknown 5 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 47%
Unspecified 10 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 5 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 April 2015.
All research outputs
#3,329,528
of 5,042,283 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,787
of 2,674 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,813
of 148,142 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#78
of 134 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,042,283 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,674 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 148,142 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 134 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.