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Evolutionary dynamics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus within a healthcare system

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
60 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
74 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
145 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
Evolutionary dynamics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus within a healthcare system
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13059-015-0643-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Li-Yang Hsu, Simon R Harris, Monika A Chlebowicz, Jodi A Lindsay, Tse-Hsien Koh, Prabha Krishnan, Thean-Yen Tan, Pei-Yun Hon, Warren B Grubb, Stephen D Bentley, Julian Parkhill, Sharon J Peacock, Matthew TG Holden

Abstract

In the past decade, several countries have seen gradual replacement of endemic multi-resistant healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with clones that are more susceptible to antibiotic treatment. One example is Singapore, where MRSA ST239, the dominant clone since molecular profiling of MRSA began in the mid-1980s, has been replaced by ST22 isolates belonging to EMRSA-15, a recently emerged pandemic lineage originating from Europe. We investigated the population structure of MRSA in Singaporean hospitals spanning three decades, using whole genome sequencing. Applying Bayesian phylogenetic methods we report that prior to the introduction of ST22, the ST239 MRSA population in Singapore originated from multiple introductions from the surrounding region; it was frequently transferred within the healthcare system resulting in a heterogeneous hospital population. Following the introduction of ST22 around the beginning of the millennium, this clone spread rapidly through Singaporean hospitals, supplanting the endemic ST239 population. Coalescent analysis revealed that although the genetic diversity of ST239 initially decreased as ST22 became more dominant, from 2007 onwards the genetic diversity of ST239 began to increase once more, which was not associated with the emergence of a sub-clone of ST239. Comparative genomic analysis of the accessory genome of the extant ST239 population identified that the Arginine Catabolic Mobile Element arose multiple times, thereby introducing genes associated with enhanced skin colonization into this population. Our results clearly demonstrate that, alongside clinical practice and antibiotic usage, competition between clones also has an important role in driving the evolution of nosocomial pathogen populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 60 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 145 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Hungary 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Taiwan 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 135 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 21%
Researcher 29 20%
Student > Bachelor 18 12%
Student > Master 14 10%
Professor 9 6%
Other 33 23%
Unknown 11 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 48 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 18 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 3%
Other 13 9%
Unknown 22 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 37. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2015.
All research outputs
#708,564
of 17,982,104 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#614
of 3,683 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,483
of 236,976 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,982,104 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,683 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,976 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them