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Hybrid male sterility between Drosophila willistoni species is caused by male failure to transfer sperm during copulation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, May 2015
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Title
Hybrid male sterility between Drosophila willistoni species is caused by male failure to transfer sperm during copulation
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0355-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alberto Civetta, Chelsea Gaudreau

Abstract

The biological concept of species stresses the importance of understanding what mechanisms maintain species reproductively isolated from each other. Often such mechanisms are divided into premating and postmating, with the latest being the result of either prezygotic or postzygotic isolation barriers. Drosophila willistoni quechua and Drosophila willistoni willistoni are two subspecies that experience reproductive isolation. When a D. w. quechua female is crossed with a D. w. willistoni male, the hybrid males (F1QW) are unable to father progeny; however, the reciprocal cross produces fertile hybrids. Thus, the mechanism of isolation is unidirectional hybrid male sterility. However, the sterile F1QW males contain large amounts of motile sperm. Here we explore whether pre-copulatory or post-copulatory pre-zygotic mechanisms serve as major deterrents in the ability of F1QW males to father progeny. Comparisons of parental and hybrid males copulation durations showed no significant reduction in copulation duration of F1QW males. Interrupted copulations of the parental species confirmed that sperm transfer occurs before the minimum copulation duration registered for F1QW males. However, we found that when females mate with F1QW males, sperm is not present inside the female storage organs and that the lack of sperm in storage is due to failure to transfer sperm rather than spillage or active sperm dumping by females. Sterility of F1QW hybrid males is primarily driven by their inability to transfer sperm during copulation.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 6%
Unknown 17 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 28%
Researcher 5 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 17%
Student > Postgraduate 2 11%
Other 1 6%
Other 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 72%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2015.
All research outputs
#3,330,850
of 5,045,006 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,285
of 1,556 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,606
of 168,859 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#55
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,045,006 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,556 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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