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Nasal mucosal microRNA expression in children with respiratory syncytial virus infection

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2015
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Title
Nasal mucosal microRNA expression in children with respiratory syncytial virus infection
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0878-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christopher S Inchley, Tonje Sonerud, Hans O Fjærli, Britt Nakstad

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a common cause of pediatric hospitalization. microRNA, key regulators of the immune system, have not previously been investigated in respiratory specimens during viral infection. We investigated microRNA expression in the nasal mucosa of 42 RSV-positive infants, also comparing microRNA expression between disease severity subgroups. Nasal mucosa cytology specimens were collected from RSV-positive infants and healthy controls. 32 microRNA were selected by microarray for qPCR verification in 19 control, 16 mild, 7 moderate and 19 severe disease samples. Compared to healthy controls, RSV-positive infants downregulated miR-34b, miR-34c, miR-125b, miR-29c, mir125a, miR-429 and miR-27b and upregulated miR-155, miR-31, miR-203a, miR-16 and let-7d. On disease subgroups analysis, miR-125a and miR-429 were downregulated in mild disease (p = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively), but not in severe disease (p = 0.3 and 0.3). microRNA expression in nasal epithelium cytology brushings of RSV-positive infants shows a distinct profile of immune-associated miRNA. miR-125a has important functions within NF-κB signaling and macrophage function. The lack of downregulation of miR-125a and miR-429 in severe disease may help explain differences in disease manifestations on infection with RSV.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 30 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 23%
Student > Master 5 16%
Other 5 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Other 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 19%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 13%
Unspecified 3 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 10%
Other 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 April 2015.
All research outputs
#4,186,301
of 5,007,236 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,364
of 2,656 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,186
of 169,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#78
of 83 outputs
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