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Developing effective policy strategies to retain health workers in rural Bangladesh: a policy analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
97 Mendeley
Title
Developing effective policy strategies to retain health workers in rural Bangladesh: a policy analysis
Published in
Human Resources for Health, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12960-015-0030-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lal B Rawal, Taufique Joarder, Sheikh Md. Shariful Islam, Aftab Uddin, Syed Masud Ahmed

Abstract

Retention of human resources for health (HRH), particularly physicians and nurses in rural and remote areas, is a major problem in Bangladesh. We reviewed relevant policies and provisions in relation to HRH aiming to develop appropriate rural retention strategies in Bangladesh. We conducted a document review, thorough search and review of relevant literature published from 1971 through May 2013, key informant interviews with policy elites (health policy makers, managers, researchers, etc.), and a roundtable discussion with key stakeholders and policy makers. We used the World Health Organization's (WHO's) guidelines as an analytical matrix to examine the rural retention policies under 4 domains, i) educational, ii) regulatory, iii) financial, and iv) professional and personal development, and 16 sub-domains. Over the past four decades, Bangladesh has developed and implemented a number of health-related policies and provisions concerning retention of HRH. The district quota system in admissions is in practice to improve geographical representation of the students. Students of special background including children of freedom fighters and tribal population have allocated quotas. In private medical and nursing schools, at least 5% of seats are allocated for scholarships. Medical education has a provision for clinical rotation in rural health facilities. Further, in the public sector, every newly recruited medical doctor must serve at least 2 years at the upazila level. To encourage serving in hard-to-reach areas, particularly in three Hill Tract districts of Chittagong division, the government provides an additional 33% of the basic salary, but not exceeding US$ 38 per month. This amount is not attractive enough, and such provision is absent for those working in other rural areas. Although the government has career development and promotion plans for doctors and nurses, these plans are often not clearly specified and not implemented effectively. The government is committed to address the rural retention problem as shown through the formulation and implementation of related policies and strategies. However, Bangladesh needs more effective policies and provisions designed specifically for attraction, deployment, and retention of HRH in rural areas, and the execution of these policies and provisions must be monitored and evaluated effectively.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Bangladesh 1 1%
Unknown 93 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 29%
Unspecified 11 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Researcher 10 10%
Student > Postgraduate 7 7%
Other 31 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 33 34%
Unspecified 16 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 14%
Social Sciences 12 12%
Business, Management and Accounting 10 10%
Other 12 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2015.
All research outputs
#1,197,469
of 5,372,803 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#219
of 424 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,806
of 175,601 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#18
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,372,803 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 424 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 175,601 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.