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Handling healthcare workforce planning with care: where do we stand?

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
40 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
124 Mendeley
Title
Handling healthcare workforce planning with care: where do we stand?
Published in
Human Resources for Health, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12960-015-0028-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mário Amorim Lopes, Álvaro Santos Almeida, Bernardo Almada-Lobo

Abstract

Planning the health-care workforce required to meet the health needs of the population, while providing service levels that maximize the outcome and minimize the financial costs, is a complex task. The problem can be described as assessing the right number of people with the right skills in the right place at the right time, to provide the right services to the right people. The literature available on the subject is vast but sparse, with no consensus established on a definite methodology and technique, making it difficult for the analyst or policy maker to adopt the recent developments or for the academic researcher to improve such a critical field. We revisited more than 60 years of documented research to better understand the chronological and historical evolution of the area and the methodologies that have stood the test of time. The literature review was conducted in electronic publication databases and focuses on conceptual methodologies rather than techniques. Four different and widely used approaches were found within the scope of supply and three within demand. We elaborated a map systematizing advantages, limitations and assumptions. Moreover, we provide a list of the data requirements necessary to implement each of the methodologies. We have also identified past and current trends in the field and elaborated a proposal on how to integrate the different methodologies. Methodologies abound, but there is still no definite approach to address HHR planning. Recent literature suggests that an integrated approach is the way to solve such a complex problem, as it combines elements both from supply and demand, and more effort should be put in improving that proposal.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 124 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 123 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 13%
Researcher 12 10%
Unspecified 10 8%
Other 32 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 15%
Social Sciences 15 12%
Business, Management and Accounting 13 10%
Unspecified 13 10%
Other 33 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 March 2019.
All research outputs
#1,032,124
of 13,441,497 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#115
of 731 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,987
of 233,516 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,441,497 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 731 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,516 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them