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A functional comparison of the domestic cat bitter receptors Tas2r38 and Tas2r43 with their human orthologs

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 1,279)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

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19 news outlets
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8 blogs
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10 X users
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6 Facebook pages

Citations

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30 Dimensions

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61 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
Title
A functional comparison of the domestic cat bitter receptors Tas2r38 and Tas2r43 with their human orthologs
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12868-015-0170-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michelle M Sandau, Jason R Goodman, Anu Thomas, Joseph B Rucker, Nancy E Rawson

Abstract

Domestic cats (felis catus) have a reputation for being rather unpredictable in their dietary choices. While their appetite for protein or savory flavors is consistent with their nutritional needs, their preference among protein-sufficient dietary options may relate to differences in the response to other flavor characteristics. Studies of domestic cat taste perception are limited, in part, due to the lack of receptor sequence information. Several studies have described the phylogenetic relationship of specific cat taste receptor sequences as compared with other carnivores. For example, domestic cats are obligate carnivores and their receptor Tas1r2, associated with the human perception of sweet, is present only as a pseudogene. Similarly, the cat perception of bitter may differ from that of other mammals due to variations in their repertoire of bitter receptor (Tas2r) genes. This report includes the first functional characterization of domestic cat taste receptors. We functionally expressed two uncharacterized domestic sequences Tas2r38 and Tas2r43 and deorphanized the receptors using a cellular functional assay. Statistical significance was determined using an unpaired, two-tailed t-test. The cat sequence for Tas2r38 contains 3 major amino acid residues known to confer the taster phenotype (PAI), which is associated with sensitivity to the bitter compounds PROP and PTC. However, in contrast to human TAS2R38, cat Tas2r38 is activated by PTC but not by PROP. Furthermore, like its human counterpart, cat Tas2r43 is activated by aloin and denatonium, but differs from the human TAS2R43 by insensitivity to saccharin. The responses of both cat receptors to the bitter ligands were concentration-dependent and were inhibited by the human bitter blocker probenecid. These data demonstrate that the response profiles of the cat bitter receptors Tas2r38 and Tas2r43 are distinct from those of their orthologous human receptors. Results with cat Tas2r38 also demonstrate that additional residues beyond those classically associated with PROP sensitivity in humans influence the sensitivity to PROP and PTC. Functional studies of the human bitter receptor family are being applied to the development of food and medicinal products with more appealing flavor profiles. Our work lays the foundation for similar work applied to felines.

X Demographics

X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 59 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 15%
Researcher 9 15%
Student > Master 9 15%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 8%
Other 11 18%
Unknown 13 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 20%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 8%
Neuroscience 5 8%
Unspecified 4 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 7%
Other 13 21%
Unknown 18 30%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 204. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 February 2022.
All research outputs
#184,381
of 24,766,831 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#4
of 1,279 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,877
of 272,197 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#2
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,766,831 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,279 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,197 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.