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MERGING conventional and complementary medicine in a clinic department – a theoretical model and practical recommendations

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
Title
MERGING conventional and complementary medicine in a clinic department – a theoretical model and practical recommendations
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12906-015-0696-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marion Pérard, Nadine Mittring, David Schweiger, Christopher Kummer, Claudia M. Witt

Abstract

Today, the increasing demand for complementary medicine encourages health care providers to adapt and create integrative medicine departments or services within clinics. However, because of their differing philosophies, historical development, and settings, merging the partners (conventional and complementary medicine) is often difficult. It is necessary to understand the similarities and differences in both cultures to support a successful and sustainable integration. The aim of this project was to develop a theoretical model and practical steps that are based on theories from mergers in business to facilitate the implementation of an integrative medicine department. Based on a literature search and expert discussions, the cultures were described and model domains were developed. These were applied to two case studies to develop the final model. Furthermore, a checklist with practical steps was devised. Conventional medicine and complementary medicine have developed different corporate cultures. The final model, which should help to foster integration by bridging between these cultures, is based on four overall aspects: culture, strategy, organizational tools and outcomes. Each culture is represented by three dimensions in the model: corporate philosophy (core and identity of the medicine and the clinic), patient (all characteristics of the professional team's contact with the patient), and professional team (the characteristics of the interactions within the professional team). Overall, corporate culture differs between conventional and complementary medicine; when planning the implementation of an integrative medicine department, the developed model and the checklist can support better integration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 5%
Unknown 19 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 15%
Researcher 3 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 15%
Professor 1 5%
Other 6 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 10%
Psychology 1 5%
Unspecified 1 5%
Other 7 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 June 2015.
All research outputs
#2,164,878
of 5,285,691 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#639
of 1,582 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,423
of 178,981 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#21
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,285,691 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,582 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 178,981 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.