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Psychological distress and its relationship with non-adherence to TB treatment: a multicentre study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, July 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
149 Mendeley
Title
Psychological distress and its relationship with non-adherence to TB treatment: a multicentre study
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0964-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Grant Theron, Jonny Peter, Lynn Zijenah, Duncan Chanda, Chacha Mangu, Petra Clowes, Andrea Rachow, Maia Lesosky, Michael Hoelscher, Alex Pym, Peter Mwaba, Peter Mason, Pamela Naidoo, Anil Pooran, Hojoon Sohn, Madhukar Pai, Dan J. Stein, Keertan Dheda

Abstract

The successful cure of tuberculosis (TB) is dependent on adherence to treatment. Various factors influence adherence, however, few are easily modifiable. There are limited data regarding correlates of psychological distress and their association with non-adherence to anti-TB treatment. In a trial of a new TB test, we measured psychological distress (K-10 score), TB-related health literacy, and morbidity (TBscore), prior to diagnosis in 1502 patients with symptoms of pulmonary TB recruited from clinics in Cape Town (n = 419), Harare (n = 400), Lusaka (n = 400), Durban (n = 200), and Mbeya (n = 83). Socioeconomic, demographic, and alcohol usage-related data were captured. Patients initiated on treatment had their DOTS cards reviewed at two-and six-months. 22 %(95 % CI: 20 %, 25 %) of patients had severe psychological distress (K-10 ≥ 30). In a multivariable linear regression model, increased K-10 score was independently associated with previous TB [estimate (95 % CI) 0.98(0.09-1.87); p = 0.0304], increased TBscore [1(0.80, 1.20); p <0.0001], and heavy alcohol use [3.08(1.26, 4.91); p = 0.0010], whereas male gender was protective [-1.47(-2.28, -0.62); p = 0.0007]. 26 % (95 % CI: 21 %, 32 %) of 261 patients with culture-confirmed TB were non-adherent. In a multivariable logistic regression model for non-adherence, reduced TBscore [OR (95 % CI) 0.639 (0.497, 0.797); p = 0.0001], health literacy score [0.798(0.696, 0.906); p = 0.0008], and increased K-10 [1.082(1.033, 1.137); p = 0.0012], and heavy alcohol usage [14.83(2.083, 122.9); p = 0.0002], were independently associated. Culture-positive patients with a K-10 score ≥ 30 were more-likely to be non-adherent (OR = 2.290(1.033-5.126); p = 0.0416]. Severe psychological distress is frequent amongst TB patients in Southern Africa. Targeted interventions to alleviate psychological distress, alcohol use, and improve health literacy in newly-diagnosed TB patients could reduce non-adherence to treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 149 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
United States 2 1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 143 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 19%
Researcher 26 17%
Student > Bachelor 19 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 11%
Student > Postgraduate 13 9%
Other 21 14%
Unknown 25 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 55 37%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 13%
Social Sciences 16 11%
Psychology 9 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 2%
Other 17 11%
Unknown 30 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 March 2016.
All research outputs
#1,062,606
of 13,651,571 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#255
of 5,089 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,257
of 229,612 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,651,571 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,089 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,612 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them