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Carbon sequestration via wood burial

Overview of attention for article published in Carbon Balance and Management, January 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 198)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
43 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
reddit
1 Redditor
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

dimensions_citation
48 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
146 Mendeley
citeulike
5 CiteULike
Title
Carbon sequestration via wood burial
Published in
Carbon Balance and Management, January 2008
DOI 10.1186/1750-0680-3-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ning Zeng

Abstract

To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink.It is estimated that a sustainable long-term carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 +/- 5 GtC y-1, and currently about 65 GtC is on the world's forest floors in the form of coarse woody debris suitable for burial. The potential is largest in tropical forests (4.2 GtC y-1), followed by temperate (3.7 GtC y-1) and boreal forests (2.1 GtC y-1). Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized.Based on data from North American logging industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be $14/tCO2($50/tC), lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is low because CO2 is removed from the atmosphere by the natural process of photosynthesis at little cost. The technique is low tech, distributed, easy to monitor, safe, and reversible, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 43 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 146 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
India 1 <1%
Vietnam 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 136 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 20%
Student > Master 28 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 19%
Student > Bachelor 17 12%
Student > Postgraduate 8 5%
Other 25 17%
Unknown 11 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 42 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 18%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 17 12%
Engineering 16 11%
Social Sciences 7 5%
Other 20 14%
Unknown 17 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 62. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 February 2021.
All research outputs
#402,884
of 17,009,769 outputs
Outputs from Carbon Balance and Management
#8
of 198 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,912
of 119,385 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Carbon Balance and Management
#1
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,009,769 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 198 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 119,385 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.