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Global plagues and the Global Fund: Challenges in the fight against HIV, TB and malaria

Overview of attention for article published in BMC International Health and Human Rights, April 2003
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#30 of 330)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
28 Mendeley
Title
Global plagues and the Global Fund: Challenges in the fight against HIV, TB and malaria
Published in
BMC International Health and Human Rights, April 2003
DOI 10.1186/1472-698x-3-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Darrell HS Tan, Ross EG Upshur, Nathan Ford

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Although a grossly disproportionate burden of disease from HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria remains in the Global South, these infectious diseases have finally risen to the top of the international agenda in recent years. Ideal strategies for combating these diseases must balance the advantages and disadvantages of 'vertical' disease control programs and 'horizontal' capacity-building approaches. DISCUSSION: The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM) represents an important step forward in the struggle against these pathogens. While its goals are laudable, significant barriers persist. Most significant is the pitiful lack of funds committed by world governments, particularly those of the very G8 countries whose discussions gave rise to the Fund. A drastic scaling up of resources is the first clear requirement for the GFATM to live up to the international community's lofty intentions. A directly related issue is that of maintaining a strong commitment to the treatment of the three diseases along with traditional prevention approaches, with the ensuing debates over providing affordable access to medications in the face of the pharmaceutical industry's vigorous protection of patent rights. SUMMARY: At this early point in the Fund's history, it remains to be seen how these issues will be resolved at the programming level. Nevertheless, it is clear that significant structural changes are required in such domains as global spending priorities, debt relief, trade policy, and corporate responsibility. HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria are global problems borne of gross socioeconomic inequality, and their solutions require correspondingly geopolitical solutions.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 4%
Brazil 1 4%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 4%
Unknown 25 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 46%
Student > Master 7 25%
Student > Bachelor 5 18%
Student > Postgraduate 3 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 11%
Other 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 57%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 18%
Social Sciences 3 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 7%
Other 7 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 July 2015.
All research outputs
#822,632
of 12,410,115 outputs
Outputs from BMC International Health and Human Rights
#30
of 330 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,659
of 236,346 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC International Health and Human Rights
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,410,115 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 330 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,346 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them