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Exploring the characteristics and potential disparities of non-migrant and migrant colorectal cancer patients regarding their satisfaction and subjective perception of care – a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, June 2018
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Title
Exploring the characteristics and potential disparities of non-migrant and migrant colorectal cancer patients regarding their satisfaction and subjective perception of care – a cross-sectional study
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3232-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marja Leonhardt, Katja Aschenbrenner, Martin E. Kreis, Johannes C. Lauscher

Abstract

Although a fifth of the German population has a migration background, health research regarding this population is scarce. The few existing studies on migrant health show that migrants are faced with restrictions regarding health care due to communication problems, a lack of information and distinct health literacy. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common tumor disease in Germany. The aim of the study is to explore the potential differences in patient characteristics between migrants and non-migrants with CRC and identify possible disparities between migrants and non-migrants regarding their satisfaction and perception with health care. A validated questionnaire was modified for CRC, supplemented with items regarding migration background, translated additionally into Arabic, Turkish and Russian and sent out to 1.694 CRC patients. The outcome indicator was 'health care satisfaction and experience' concerning 'medical consultation', 'medical treatment (therapy)' and 'hospital stay' measured on 10-point Likert-scales; explanatory variables were migration background, age, gender, mother tongue, occupation, follow-up care, current discomfort and current treatment. Following descriptive statistics, factor analysis was conducted to compute the outcome variables. Differences between migrants and non-migrants were analyzed using Mann-Whitney-U test and regression analyses. A total of 522 completed questionnaires - 30.8% response rate - were used for analysis. Patients with a migration background attended less often follow up care than non-migrant patients (74.7% vs. 88.6%; p = 0.001). Mean scores regarding satisfaction and experience with consultation, medical treatment (therapy) and hospital stay were 7.86, 7.11 and 7.51 for migrants and 7.84, 7.19 and 7.33 for non-migrants, measured on a 1 to 10 scale with 10 being most satisfied. Migrants were less satisfied with their own involvement in decision making (p = 0.029) and the aspect "responsiveness to patient's questions" (p = 0.048) than non-migrants. Migrants showed less compliance with regard to follow-up care than non-migrants. Furthermore, migrants were more often dissatisfied with communication with the medical staff than non-migrants. This shows the importance of (cross-cultural) communication skills on the part of physicians and nurses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 7 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 17%
Student > Master 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 10 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 8 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 14%
Psychology 4 11%
Other 6 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 December 2018.
All research outputs
#11,628,429
of 13,087,494 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#4,033
of 4,353 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#235,472
of 270,544 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
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