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A North American stem turaco, and the complex biogeographic history of modern birds

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Ecology and Evolution, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
69 X users
facebook
5 Facebook pages
wikipedia
6 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
1 YouTube creator

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
Title
A North American stem turaco, and the complex biogeographic history of modern birds
Published in
BMC Ecology and Evolution, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12862-018-1212-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel J. Field, Allison Y. Hsiang

Abstract

Earth's lower latitudes boast the majority of extant avian species-level and higher-order diversity, with many deeply diverging clades restricted to vestiges of Gondwana. However, palaeontological analyses reveal that many avian crown clades with restricted extant distributions had stem group relatives in very different parts of the world. Our phylogenetic analyses support the enigmatic fossil bird Foro panarium Olson 1992 from the early Eocene (Wasatchian) of Wyoming as a stem turaco (Neornithes: Pan-Musophagidae), a clade that is presently endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Our analyses offer the first well-supported evidence for a stem musophagid (and therefore a useful fossil calibration for avian molecular divergence analyses), and reveal surprising new information on the early morphology and biogeography of this clade. Total-clade Musophagidae is identified as a potential participant in dispersal via the recently proposed 'North American Gateway' during the Palaeogene, and new biogeographic analyses illustrate the importance of the fossil record in revealing the complex historical biogeography of crown birds across geological timescales. In the Palaeogene, total-clade Musophagidae was distributed well outside the range of crown Musophagidae in the present day. This observation is consistent with similar biogeographic observations for numerous other modern bird clades, illustrating shortcomings of historical biogeographic analyses that do not incorporate information from the avian fossil record.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 69 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 24%
Researcher 10 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Student > Bachelor 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 12 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 39%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 13%
Environmental Science 3 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 15 33%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 135. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 September 2021.
All research outputs
#308,274
of 25,385,509 outputs
Outputs from BMC Ecology and Evolution
#52
of 3,714 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,696
of 342,237 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Ecology and Evolution
#3
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,385,509 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,714 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 342,237 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.