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Canine atopic dermatitis: detailed guidelines for diagnosis and allergen identification

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
9 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
191 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
424 Mendeley
Title
Canine atopic dermatitis: detailed guidelines for diagnosis and allergen identification
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12917-015-0515-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Patrick Hensel, Domenico Santoro, Claude Favrot, Peter Hill, Craig Griffin

Abstract

Canine atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, genetically predisposed, inflammatory and pruritic skin disease. The variation in clinical presentations, due to genetic factors, extent of the lesions, stage of the disease, secondary infections, as well as resemblance to other non-atopic related skin diseases, can complicate a diagnosis of canine AD. A sub-group of the International Committee for Allergic Diseases in Animals (ICADA) was tasked with the development of a set of practical guidelines that can be used to assist practitioners and researchers in the diagnosis of canine AD. Online citation databases and abstracts from international meetings were searched for publications related to the topic, and combined with expert opinion where necessary. The final set of guidelines was approved by the entire ICADA committee. A total of 81 publications relevant for this review were identified. The guidelines generated focus on three aspects of the diagnostic approach: 1. Ruling out of other skin conditions with clinical signs resembling, or overlapping with canine AD. 2. Detailed interpretation of the historical and clinical features of patients affected by canine AD. 3. Allergy testing by intradermal versus allergen-specific IgE serum testing. The diagnosis of canine AD is based on meeting clinical criteria and ruling out other possible causes with similar clinical signs. Flea combing, skin scraping and cytology should be performed, where necessary, as part of a thorough work-up. Elimination diet trials are required for patients with perennial pruritus and/or concurrent gastrointestinal signs. Once a clinical diagnosis of canine AD is made, allergy testing can be performed to identify potential causative allergens for allergen-specific immunotherapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 424 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Unknown 420 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 70 17%
Student > Master 69 16%
Other 47 11%
Student > Postgraduate 30 7%
Researcher 25 6%
Other 57 13%
Unknown 126 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 198 47%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 32 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 1%
Other 17 4%
Unknown 127 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2020.
All research outputs
#2,059,212
of 22,292,003 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#121
of 2,991 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,278
of 254,274 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,292,003 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,991 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,274 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.