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Early salpingectomy (TUbectomy) with delayed oophorectomy to improve quality of life as alternative for risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers (TUBA study): a prospective non…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

Citations

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40 Dimensions

Readers on

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65 Mendeley
Title
Early salpingectomy (TUbectomy) with delayed oophorectomy to improve quality of life as alternative for risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers (TUBA study): a prospective non-randomised multicentre study
Published in
BMC Cancer, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1597-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marline G. Harmsen, Marieke Arts-de Jong, Nicoline Hoogerbrugge, Angela H. E. M. Maas, Judith B. Prins, Johan Bulten, Steven Teerenstra, Eddy M. M. Adang, Jurgen M. J. Piek, Helena C van Doorn, Marc van Beurden, Marian J. E. Mourits, Ronald P. Zweemer, Katja N. Gaarenstroom, Brigitte F. M. Slangen, M. Caroline Vos, Luc R. C. W. van Lonkhuijzen, Leon F. A. G. Massuger, Rosella P. M. G. Hermens, Joanne A. de Hullu

Abstract

Risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) around the age of 40 is currently recommended to BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. This procedure decreases the elevated ovarian cancer risk by 80-96 % but it initiates premature menopause as well. The latter is associated with short-term and long-term morbidity, potentially affecting quality of life (QoL). Based on recent insights into the Fallopian tube as possible site of origin of serous ovarian carcinomas, an alternative preventive strategy has been put forward: early risk-reducing salpingectomy (RRS) and delayed oophorectomy (RRO). However, efficacy and safety of this alternative strategy have to be investigated. A multicentre non-randomised trial in 11 Dutch centres for hereditary cancer will be conducted. Eligible patients are premenopausal BRCA1/2 mutation carriers after completing childbearing without (a history of) ovarian carcinoma. Participants choose between standard RRSO at age 35-40 (BRCA1) or 40-45 (BRCA2) and the alternative strategy (RRS upon completion of childbearing and RRO at age 40-45 (BRCA1) or 45-50 (BRCA2)). Women who opt for RRS but do not want to postpone RRO beyond the currently recommended age are included as well. Primary outcome measure is menopause-related QoL. Secondary outcome measures are ovarian/breast cancer incidence, surgery-related morbidity, histopathology, cardiovascular risk factors and diseases, and cost-effectiveness. Mixed model data analysis will be performed. The exact role of the Fallopian tube in ovarian carcinogenesis is still unclear. It is not expected that further fundamental research will elucidate this role in the near future. Therefore, this clinical trial is essential to investigate RRS with delayed RRO as alternative risk-reducing strategy in order to improve QoL. ClinicalTrials.gov ( NCT02321228 ).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 65 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 18%
Student > Master 10 15%
Unspecified 9 14%
Researcher 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Other 20 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 46%
Unspecified 14 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 9%
Psychology 5 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Other 8 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 August 2015.
All research outputs
#2,693,030
of 11,329,665 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#641
of 4,154 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,054
of 235,898 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#15
of 136 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,329,665 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,154 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,898 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 136 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.