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Introduction of oral vitamin D supplementation and the rise of the allergy pandemic

Overview of attention for article published in Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology, November 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

dimensions_citation
40 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
Title
Introduction of oral vitamin D supplementation and the rise of the allergy pandemic
Published in
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology, November 2009
DOI 10.1186/1710-1492-5-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthias Wjst

Abstract

The history of the allergy pandemic is well documented, enabling us to put the vitamin D hypothesis into its historical context. The purpose of this study is to compare the prevalence of rickets, vitamin D supply, and allergy prevalence at 50-year intervals by means of a retrospective analysis of the literature since 1880. English cities in 1880 were characterized by an extremely high rickets prevalence, the beginning of commercial cod liver oil production, and the near absence of any allergic diseases. By 1930 hay fever prevalence had risen to about 3% in English-speaking countries where cod liver oil was preferentially used for the treatment of rickets. In 1980 vitamin D was used nation-wide in all industrialized countries as supplement to industrial baby food, thus eradicating nearly all cases of rickets. At the same time the allergy prevalence reached an all-time high, affecting about 30% of the population. Time trends are therefore compatible with the vitamin D hypothesis although direct conclusions cannot be drawn. It is interesting, however, to note that there are at least two earlier research papers linking synthesized vitamin D intake and allergy (Reed 1930 and Selye 1962) published prior to the modern vitamin D hypothesis first proposed in 1999.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Australia 1 3%
Unknown 32 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 15%
Researcher 5 15%
Other 2 6%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 6%
Other 12 35%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 4 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2022.
All research outputs
#1,270,471
of 21,825,352 outputs
Outputs from Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
#66
of 821 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,278
of 132,678 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
#6
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,825,352 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 821 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 132,678 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.