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Low-frequency vibratory exercise reduces the risk of bone fracture more than walking: a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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179 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
196 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Low-frequency vibratory exercise reduces the risk of bone fracture more than walking: a randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2006
DOI 10.1186/1471-2474-7-92
Pubmed ID
Authors

Narcís Gusi, Armando Raimundo, Alejo Leal

Abstract

Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a new type of exercise that has been increasingly tested for the ability to prevent bone fractures and osteoporosis in frail people. There are two currently marketed vibrating plates: a) the whole plate oscillates up and down; b) reciprocating vertical displacements on the left and right side of a fulcrum, increasing the lateral accelerations. A few studies have shown recently the effectiveness of the up-and-down plate for increasing Bone Mineral Density (BMD) and balance; but the effectiveness of the reciprocating plate technique remains mainly unknown. The aim was to compare the effects of WBV using a reciprocating platform at frequencies lower than 20 Hz and a walking-based exercise programme on BMD and balance in post-menopausal women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 196 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Netherlands 2 1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 188 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 19%
Student > Master 34 17%
Researcher 28 14%
Unspecified 23 12%
Professor 17 9%
Other 57 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 65 33%
Sports and Recreations 36 18%
Unspecified 33 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 9%
Other 27 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 May 2013.
All research outputs
#3,663,277
of 7,877,008 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,046
of 2,038 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,741
of 88,103 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#50
of 71 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,877,008 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,038 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 88,103 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 71 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.