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How group singing facilitates recovery from the symptoms of postnatal depression: a comparative qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychology, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#19 of 300)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
53 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
59 Mendeley
Title
How group singing facilitates recovery from the symptoms of postnatal depression: a comparative qualitative study
Published in
BMC Psychology, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40359-018-0253-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rosie Perkins, Sarah Yorke, Daisy Fancourt

Abstract

Previous research has demonstrated that making music can enhance positive emotions as well as support positive psychological functioning. However, studies tend to be limited by lack of comparison with other psychosocial interventions. This study builds on a three-arm randomised controlled trial (RCT) that demonstrated that group singing for mothers and babies, but not group creative play, can lead to faster recovery from moderate-severe symptoms of postnatal depression than usual care. The aim was to elucidate the mechanisms of the group singing intervention in order to account for its recovery properties. Qualitative research was conducted with 54 mothers who had experienced symptoms of postnatal depression. Mothers completed a 10-week programme of either group singing or group creative play as part of the wider RCT study. Data were collected via a series of 10 semi-structured focus groups conducted at the end of each 10-week programme. These were designed to elicit subjective and constructed experiences of the singing and play interventions and were analysed inductively for emergent themes. Five distinctive features of the group singing emerged: (i) providing an authentic, social and multicultural creative experience, (ii) ability to calm babies; (iii) providing immersive 'me time' for mothers; (iv) facilitating a sense of achievement and identity; (v) enhancing mother-infant bond. Community group singing interventions may reduce symptoms of postnatal depression through facilitating a functional emotional response rooted in the needs of new motherhood. These features are of relevance to others seeking to implement creative interventions for maternal mental health. NCT02526407 . Registered 18 August 2015.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 53 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 11 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 19%
Student > Master 10 17%
Researcher 8 14%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 15 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 15 25%
Psychology 10 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 15%
Arts and Humanities 7 12%
Other 8 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 56. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2019.
All research outputs
#307,811
of 13,483,630 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychology
#19
of 300 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,222
of 269,426 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,483,630 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 300 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,426 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them