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Nutritional therapies for mental disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, January 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
109 tweeters
facebook
30 Facebook pages
wikipedia
17 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
6 Google+ users
video
7 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
132 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
661 Mendeley
citeulike
6 CiteULike
Title
Nutritional therapies for mental disorders
Published in
Nutrition Journal, January 2008
DOI 10.1186/1475-2891-7-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shaheen E Lakhan, Karen F Vieira

Abstract

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4 out of the 10 leading causes of disability in the US and other developed countries are mental disorders. Major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) are among the most common mental disorders that currently plague numerous countries and have varying incidence rates from 26 percent in America to 4 percent in China. Though some of this difference may be attributable to the manner in which individual healthcare providers diagnose mental disorders, this noticeable distribution can be also explained by studies which show that a lack of certain dietary nutrients contribute to the development of mental disorders. Notably, essential vitamins, minerals, and omega-3 fatty acids are often deficient in the general population in America and other developed countries; and are exceptionally deficient in patients suffering from mental disorders. Studies have shown that daily supplements of vital nutrients often effectively reduce patients' symptoms. Supplements that contain amino acids also reduce symptoms, because they are converted to neurotransmitters that alleviate depression and other mental disorders. Based on emerging scientific evidence, this form of nutritional supplement treatment may be appropriate for controlling major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders, eating disorders, attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD), addiction, and autism. The aim of this manuscript is to emphasize which dietary supplements can aid the treatment of the four most common mental disorders currently affecting America and other developed countries: major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Most antidepressants and other prescription drugs cause severe side effects, which usually discourage patients from taking their medications. Such noncompliant patients who have mental disorders are at a higher risk for committing suicide or being institutionalized. One way for psychiatrists to overcome this noncompliance is to educate themselves about alternative or complementary nutritional treatments. Although in the cases of certain nutrients, further research needs to be done to determine the best recommended doses of most nutritional supplements, psychiatrists can recommend doses of dietary supplements based on previous and current efficacious studies and then adjust the doses based on the results obtained.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 109 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 661 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 1%
Australia 6 <1%
Mexico 3 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
France 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Other 7 1%
Unknown 630 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 172 26%
Student > Master 115 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 62 9%
Researcher 61 9%
Other 47 7%
Other 129 20%
Unknown 75 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 193 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 106 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 72 11%
Psychology 71 11%
Social Sciences 25 4%
Other 105 16%
Unknown 89 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 210. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 May 2022.
All research outputs
#131,335
of 21,264,041 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#52
of 1,384 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#747
of 248,699 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#5
of 108 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,264,041 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,384 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,699 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 108 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.